Real world castaways found by the Mad Foxes

News From 7th Fleet:

Two men wave life jackets and look on as a U.S. Navy P-8A maritime surveillance aircraft

That’s pretty good resolution from a P-8…(U.S. Navy photo by Ensign John Knight/Released)

Two men wave life jackets and look on as a U.S. Navy P-8A maritime surveillance aircraft, Madfox 807, discovers them on the uninhabited island of Fanadik. Three days earlier, the three’s 19-foot skiff capsized after setting out to sea from Pulap, FSM. The P-8A, attached to Patrol Squadron (VP) 5, and operating from Misawa, Japan, responded to a call for assistance from the U.S. Coast Guard and located the men as they waved life jackets and stood next to a large “help” sign made of palm leaves.

The men reported their vessel was capsized by a large wave a few hours after their departure on April 4, and spent the night swimming until they arrived at Fanadik Island, approximately four nautical miles from Pulap. A small boat from Pulap recovered the men from the island with no reported injuries.

(U.S. Navy photo by Ensign John Knight/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo by Ensign John Knight/Released)

It’s far from VP-5s first far-off rescue. The Navy’s second oldest VP squadron, the Mad Foxes were stood up in 1937 and made fame in the “Kiska Blitz” during which their aviators nursed PM-1s through thick Alaskan fog to plaster the Japanese in the Aleutians while keeping an eye peeled for lost P-40 and B-17 crews.

Switching to PV-2 Harpoons the PV-2 Neptunes after the war, they helped pluck one of America’s first astronauts, Commander Alan Shepard, Jr, from the drink, then helped quarantine Cuba. Switching to the P-3 Orion they provided night radar coverage of the Gulf of Tonkin in defense of USN aircraft carriers and went back to the Atlantic to finish the Cold War, even babysitting a stricken Soviet Yankee class sub in 1986.

They switched to the P-8A Poseidon in 2013.

VP-5-photo_logo

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