You do know the S&W 45 Target Model, yes?

Back in 1917, Smith & Wesson was tapped by the U.S. Army to deliver a second-line revolver chambered in .45 ACP, a rimless round that was already standard for Uncle Sam as it was the fodder of the M1911A1.

The resulting six-shooter, logically adopted as the M1917, was an early N-frame and remained in U.S. service through the Second World War, as well as bringing Big Blue some post-war coin in overseas contracts to places like Brazil.

Smith & Wesson Model of 1917 .45acp DA revolver, 1918 Army Signal Corps Photo 165-WW-387E-001 (cropped)

Fast forward to the days immediately after WWII, and S&W cleaned up the M1917 for the commercial market as the “Model 1950 .45 Army.”

However, with Bullseye shooting taking off, a version that was factory optimized for competition, with a large Partridge front sight, target hammer, barrel and trigger, and hand-filling checkered grips was needed.

Enter the “45 Target Model,” introduced in 1955.

Two years later, Smith would dub it the Model 25, and, in both .45ACP and .45Colt variants, it remains in production today.

More in my column at Guns.com.

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