Category Archives: gun culture

Lot of Bang for the Buck

Two years ago, Taurus delivered the TX 22 pistol to the market, and, by and large, everyone that held their nose long enough to shoot it absolutely loved it. The gun proved super reliable, well thought out, and feature-rich– especially for the money. Pistols like it and last year’s G3C have really changed people’s minds on Taurus.

Well, the company now has a more aristocratic installment of the same model, just announced today, the TX 22 Competition.

The TX 22 Comp has a distinctive skeletonized slide similar to a Beretta 92/Taurus PT92 with a cutout between the ejection port to just behind the front sight. The pistol runs a 5-inch match-grade bull barrel that is threaded for suppressors and muzzle devices such as compensators. The trigger has been updated for better performance. Best yet, the slide has an optics cut and is ready right out of the box to accommodate a range of popular red dots, all for under $500.

More in my column at Guns.com.

Know when to fold em

I’ve always had a curious fascination with folding guns, going back to the Hotchkiss Universal and the ARES/Warin Stealth Gun of the 1980s.

A fellow by the name of Utah Connor built a folding sub-gun very similar to the ARES disguised as a radio (complete with collapsing antenna) in the mid-1970s. The concept was that plainclothes police officers and security personnel could sit and chill out with the ‘radio’ at their feet or on a table and, with practice, deploy it in 2-3 seconds.

Connor called his curio the “Undercover 9” or UC-9.

In 2008, Magpul displayed their concept of the ARES/UC-9, a sub-gun that folded up to look like a laptop battery. Of course, it was vaporware but it nonetheless made it into video games.

Well, Magpul last week announced it has more than a half dozen new reasons to love them in the upcoming year ranging from new magazine and furniture offerings to…the fabled FDP-9 folding gun.

The FDP9/FDC-9 uses a ZEV OZ9 operating system and a Magpul chassis. (Photo: Magpul).

With Glock internals.

It’s supposed to arrive in 2022. Holding my breath but cautiously optimistic.

And the March Towards Optics-Ready Pistols Goes Forth

Stretching out their popular FN 509 platform, FN on Monday announced its new factory-tuned LS Edge pistol, designed to have many of the same features as a fully customized handgun direct from the factory.

Billed as the “ultimate tactical pistol” the 9mm FN 509 LS Edge has an optics-ready slide over a 5-inch hammer-forged target-crowned barrel. By comparison, the standard FN 509 Tactical series uses a 4.5-inch threaded barrel on a shorter slide with a shorter sight radius. Going past the added length, the 509 Edge LS also brings with it enhanced ergonomics and adaptability along with a flat-face, facet-edge trigger, and other features.

FN’s continuing on the optics cut as-standard trend that the rest of the firearms industry has been moving towards for years, and seems to be doing it nicely.

More in my column at Guns.com.

For those who have invested in 5.7, KelTec has Just the Thing

Confirming rumors and leaks, KelTec on Tuesday announced the new P50, a 50-round 5.7x28mm pistol, is inbound for 2021.

Using horizontally-oriented FN P90 mags secured under a top cover, the 3.2-pound large-format pistol runs 15 inches overall with a threaded 9.6-inch barrel. The gun is distinctive, with a look that recalls the futuristic polymer guns of the 1980s. 

Expect this thing to be in every sci-fi feature for the next 30 years…

More in my column at Guns.com.

Quiet Time with a 1909 Maxim

The first “silencer” was invented by Hiram Percy Maxim over a century ago, who marketed an entire line of these cheap little mufflers for your rifle and pistol long before the NFA was a thing.

In the below short, Kevin Brittingham with Q brings in one of these relics for show and tell – a 1909 Maxim rimfire silencer, to be exact. Brittingham also discusses the history of the silencer, and why it was invented.

Canada and the Everlasting Inglis Hi-Power

The Canadian government is reportedly moving forward with a plan to replace its military’s downright vintage Browning Hi-Power pistols. 

Local media in Ottawa, the country’s capital, are advising that a contract for as many as 20,000 “modular pistols” will be issued later this year for the Canadian Army, Royal Canadian Air Force, and military police. The guns will replace Canadian-produced Inglis Brownings made during World War II. 

Yup, as in 1944-45 production.

Canadian-made No. 2 Mk1* Inglis Hi-Powers, produced between 1944 and 1945, are distinctive period BHP clones with the “thumbprint” slide, high rear sight, and internal extractor, features that FN discontinued by the early 1950s. (Photo: Canadian Forces Combat Camera)

More in my column at Guns.com.

Take Care of Your Local Public Range

On the final day of 2020, the Bureau of Land Management issued guidance to its local, state, and district offices to preserve and expand recreational shooting opportunities on the millions of acres of public lands under the agency. When I say millions of acres, I should actually clarify that it is hundreds of millions, as BLM controls some 245 million acres, with some 99 percent of it open to some sort of recreational shooting.

This, of course, is a good thing as there are some 50~ million American sports shooters and hunters, most of whom are always looking for a good place to shoot.

This brings me to my soapbox. As someone who regularly visits a public range in DeSoto National Forest, provided by the USDA Forest Service, please, please leave it as or better than you found it.

For instance, this was the trash area at the Black Creek Range this weekend:

I cleaned up a lot of this and physically packed out my own trash as well as some other litter, but you get the point.

These ranges belong to everyone, so please make sure they are useable for your grandchildren as well.

Flash and the locals

Here we see a Daimler Mk. 1 Scout Car, apparently named “Flash”, crewed by Troopers W. Balinnan and A. Gallant of an unidentified Canadian reconnaissance regiment [likely the 4th Reconnaissance Regiment/IV Princess Louise’s Dragoon Guards], after the capture of Bagnacavallo, in Northern Italy’s Ravenna region, 3 January 1945.

The Canucks are speaking with a pair of local partisans, Louisa and Italo Cristofori. Note Louisa’s M1928 Thompson sub gun.

Photographer: Alexander Mackenzie Stirton. Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No.

Five regiments operated the Daimler in Canadian service during WWII besides Princess Louise’s– the Royal Canadian Dragoons, 12th Manitoba Dragoons, 17th Duke of York’s Royal Canadian Hussars and 14th Canadian Hussars– besides numerous smaller units that had a car or two for liaison and recce tasks.

The Daimler typically carries a 2-pounder (40mm) gun as well as a coaxial light machine gun. It could make 50 mph on good roads but only had enough armor to defeat machine gun rounds. It apparently remained in service with some Commonwealth countries as late as 2012.

Turns Out, People Like Pistols

Out of the thousands of firearms that Guns.com sold this year, the most popular category was for semi-auto handguns, which is not surprising as that category has consistently seen the highest production numbers by the domestic firearms industry for the past several years.

Want to take a guess at the top 10?

Spoiler alert: it includes a single Taurus and Ruger, two Sig Sauers, two S&Ws, and four Glocks…

If you are one of the 4+ million Stabilizing Brace Owners, now is your time

Federal regulators on Friday set off the starting pistol in the race to establish what stabilizing brace makers term the largest firearm registration scheme in American history. 

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives scheduled its proposed 15-page “Objective Factors for Classifying Stabilizer Braces” to publish Dec. 18 in the Federal Register, the official journal of the federal government, for public inspection. Americans have two weeks to provide feedback on the plan, which could be the last chance to make their voice heard on the issue before ATF moves forward.

Written comments on the ATF proposal must be postmarked by, and electronic comments must be submitted on or before Jan. 1, 2021, by midnight Eastern time. SB Tactical is also encouraging members of the public, who are concerned about the issue, to reach out to their lawmakers in Congress as well as the White House.

More background on the brace issue in my column at Guns.com here and here.

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