Archive | ccw RSS for this section

Colt reboots the 1980s classic King Cobra, but with a 3-inch barrel

Offered in brushed stainless steel with a full-lug 3-inch barrel, the six-shot .357/.38SPL King Cobra was announced this week and will be officially on hand at SHOT at the end of the month.

The choice of barrel length on the new King Cobra is interesting. The original revolver was first introduced in 1986 and was made in 2, 2.5, 4, 6 and 8-inch variants across the revolver’s original commercial production, which ended in 1998. Just a few spec guns (less than 20) were made with a 3-inch format for various police tenders but they never went into production.

I’ve always liked the 3-inch barrel on a carry revolver as I have mentioned a few times before as it provides more velocity over a snub– not to mention a skosh longer sight radius– while being more concealable than a 4-inch combat gun. I have an old-school (pre-suck) Rossi full-lug stainless M720 in .44 Special that I have taken in the swamp several times as a hog hunting back up.

For more on the new Colt 3-inch King, head to my column at Guns.com.

Mossberg…now in a pistol

In honor of their 100th Anniversary, Mossberg has announced a return to the type of platform they launched with in 1919 — a compact pistol.

Announced Thursday, the new 9mm Mossberg MC1sc pistol weighs some 22-ounces while fully loaded (19 empty), largely due to its polymer frame. Billed as ideal for every day carry, the new pistol boasts a 6-round flush-fit and 7-round extended magazine while a 3.4-inch barrel translates to a 6.25-inch overall length. As such, it is about the same size as the standard Glock 43 which boasts the same magazine capacity.

The problem is, with so much market share already invested deep in the Ruger LC9/EC9, S&W Sheild, HK VP9SK, and the G43, I feel like this pistol will get about as much love as the Taurus AR15 or Remington R51.

More in my column at Guns.com

New Glock Slim models inbound

Meet the new 9mm 10+1 capacity Glock 43X and Glock 48. Two guns with the same frame, the 43X runs 6.06-inches long while the G48 is 6.85-inches (which makes it eligible for import to Canada) and yes, both are two-tone.

Sure to be the buzz of SHOT Show this month, the official release date is 21 January but most Glock retailers are already taking preorders for about $475~ in the standard models, $500 with Glock night sights and $575 with Ameriglos, although your mileage may vary.

Glock’s presser, released 2 January:

Today, GLOCK, Inc. announces two additions to the GLOCK pistol family. The GLOCK 43X and the GLOCK 48 feature the design of the Slimline series with a silver slide and are a perfect fit for everyday carry. Chambered in 9X19, both pistols feature a compact Slimiline frame with silver nPVD finish and a 10-round magazine capacity making them ideal for concealed carry.

“With the success of the Slimline series in the marketplace and over one million GLOCK 43 pistols sold in just three years, the Slimline series pistols have been tested, trusted and proven,” said GLOCK, Inc. VP Josh Dorsey. “We listened to the consumers request for a GLOCK Slimline model with increased round capacity and both of these pistols deliver that flawlessly. GLOCK’s continued pursuit of perfection drives innovation while not straying from our promise of reliability and durability and that is demonstrated in the G43X and G48.”

Designed for comfort, the G43X and G48 combine a fuller-size grip length with a minimal profile of approximately 1” for a comfortably balanced, versatile grip that’s ideal for a variety of users. While the two pistols share the same size frame, they have different slide lengths. The slide for the G43X is the same sub-compact length as the G43 (6.06 in.) while the G48 has a compact length (6.85 in) and is compliant with Canadian regulations.

These pistols incorporate elements of the Slimline series such as the short trigger distance, a frame with a built-in beavertail, a reversible magazine catch and the incredibly accurate, match-grade GLOCK Marksman Barrel (GMB). The G43X and G48 also feature precision-milled front serrations. Both models are available in three sight configurations; standard, GLOCK Night Sights (GNS), and Ameriglo BOLD.

Here is what people thought about them in a man-on-the-street that we did at Guns.com.

More to come, of course.

Oh, Baby

The very cute Browning Baby had a lot going for it when it was introduced in 1931. Just 9-ounces, the pipsqueak gatt was reliable, made of steel, and could fit in a pocket, and allow 6+1 shots to the user.

On the downside, it was chambered in the downright lilliputian 6.35mm (.25ACP), which is still better than a poke it the eye, but not by much.

Nonetheless, it gained popularity over time. Prior to WWII some 50,147 of these guns were produced by FN in the decade before the assembly line was interrupted by the Germans– and in return, some of those early guns made it to the hands of the Resistance, where their size came in handy

Then, after the U.S. market opened up and the guns were sold there via the Browning Arms Company in 1954, the gun really caught on, with over 13,000 shipping to the states that year alone. By 1968, production had ramped up to more than 42,000 Babies per year.

Then came the Gun Control Act of 1968, and the wheels fell off.

More in my column at Guns.com

The G is still buying (a few) revolvers

What can I say, everyone loves wheelguns, right? (And yes, that is my Colt Dick along with same-period Roscoe switchblade, thanks for noticing!)

The Government Accountability Office last week released a report on recent purchases of firearms, ammunition and tactical equipment by federal law enforcement agencies.

The 86-page report focused on the weapons acquired by 20 diverse federal agencies ranging from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Inspector General to the FBI. What it found were that the agencies reported spending at least $38.8 million on firearms, $325.9 million on ammunition, and $1.14 billion on tactical equipment in the past eight years.

Of interest to wheelgun lovers will be the fact that at least three of the agencies — NPPD, ICE, and U.S. Secret Service — reported buying small numbers of revolvers recently, although they accounted for less than 1 percent of total purchases across the review. Other revolvers appeared on the existing inventory of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services OIG, and the IRS, proving the old hog leg is not as dead as to be believed.

More insights into the report in my column at Guns.com.

A new take on an old idea

The first revolver speedloader patented was that of William H. Bell in 1879. Bell’s device was a simple metal disk with a rotating locking mechanism that held six revolver rounds. When used with a top-break revolver of the time, such as the Smith and Wesson Lemon squeezer, the speedloader would drop six ready rounds in the cylinder extremely rapidly. It is unclear if Bell’s device ever was manufactured, but it certainly seems like the first of its species.

Now, 130 years later, people are still tweaking the idea.

CK Tactical went live with their Ripcord series five and six-round revolver speedloaders in September and they have been generating some buzz in the gun industry and earning newfound fans. Their signature product is designed, like other speedloaders, to hold a full load of spare rounds for a wheel gun until needed, then dump them into the cylinder.

Unlike existing Safariland and HKS loaders that use a central knob or button, the Ripcord, as its name implies, is designed to be deployed by pulling by a loading tab, leaving the cartridges behind.

At a cost of $10 for a two-pack, CKT currently offers the loader in two different models with a range of compatibility with various Chiappa, Rossi, Ruger, S&W, and Taurus revolvers. As such, I am getting a few sets to see how they stack up against the Bianchi speed strips and HKS/Safariland loaders I’ve used for years.

More on the CKT in my column at Guns.com.

Nice to see blued steel is back

Ruger is offering a variant of their classic SP101 small frame double-action revolver for those who eschew the gun’s normal stainless configurations.

The new five-round wheel gun is manufactured from alloy steel, and features a 2.25-inch barrel, fixed rear sight and ramped front sight. Chambered in .357 Magnum and weighing in at 26-ounces, Chris Killoy, Ruger president & CEO said in a statement the company has fielded numerous customer requests for the new model, which is manufactured in their New Hampshire plant.

More in my column at Guns.com.

Yokosuka Sasebo Japan

The U.S. Navy and the Western Pacific

The Writer in Black

News and views from The Writer in Black

Stephen Taylor WW2 Relic Hunter

World War 2 Historian, Relic Hunter and expert in identification of WW2 relics

USS Gerald R. Ford

Mission Ready, Qualified & Competent, On Time Execution!

The Unwritten Record

Exploring History with the National Archives Special Media Division

Stuff From Hsoi

Writing about whatever interests me, and maybe you.

Louisville Gun

Thoughts and Musings on Gun Control & Crime

CIVILIAN GUNFIGHTER

Identifying the Best Training, Tools, and Tactics for the Armed Civilian!

MountainGuerrilla

Nous Defions!

Under Every Leaf.

A Site for the British Empire 1860-1913

JULESWINGS

Military wings and things

Western Rifle Shooters Association

Learn. Build. Preserve. Teach.

Meccanica Mekaniikka Mecanică

The Mechanix of Auto, Aviation, Military...pert near anything I feel relates to mechanical things, places, events or whatever I happen to like. Even non-mechanical artsy-fartsy stuff.

Eatgrueldog

Where misinformation stops and you are force fed the truth III

The LBM Blogger

Make Big Noise

%d bloggers like this: