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If you follow the pew-pew life, but don’t carry a blowout kit, there is something wrong with your love story

One thing often tragically neglected by people who think they are prepared is the ability to respond to a serious causality incident, where a trauma kit and some knowledge of how to use it can save lives– even your own.

If the terrible events of the past several days have proven anything is that you can expect the unexpected to rear its horrible head when and where you least anticipate. In a world of domestic and international terrorism, if you live, work or play near a large city you can quickly find yourself in the middle of a nightmare where overtaxed first responders may not be available or are stretched too thin to control the situation until additional resources appear. On the opposite side of the coin, in a rural or suburban area where a small-scale accident or incident pops off, you could find yourself isolated with the nearest support vital minutes or even hours away. It’s these moments, where conventional civilian emergency medicine protocols fail, that are the most dangerous.

Thus, the need to be ready for trauma.

More in my column at Tac.44.com.

One of these things is not like the other…or is it?

Just got my hot little hands on S&W’s new M&P 2.0 Compact in 9mm, which Smith plans on pitting against the always-popular (in polymer pistol circles) Glock 19.

Going through the specs, the Compact uses a 4-inch barrel and has a 15+1 round capacity in 9mm and 13+1 in the .40 variant with an unloaded weight of just under 24-ounces. This is a dead ringer in comparison to the Glock 19 and 23 and a hair lighter than the 26-ounce P-10 C series from Czech gun maker CZ.

I plan on having fun shooting them head-to-head and I have already found things I like about it over the Glock, though it does have a few thorns.

The old loaded chamber arguement

Ever since the first repeating handguns hit the market, the debate has ensued on carrying said hog leg on a loaded chamber

Most will say that carrying with an empty chamber is like saying you will have enough time to put on a seat belt in the second before you get in a car crash.

But in some cases, it may be a good idea…

The subject from both sides of the argument in my column at Tac44.com.

Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster at your side, kid

The modern equivalent of Han Solo’s DL-44 blaster, via SureFire:

The above set up consists of a Glock 17 with ALG Defense 6 Second Mount & mag well, Aimpoint T1, KKM Precision barrel & comp, and SureFire X300 U-Boat.

I prefer Inforce on my G19, as well as a mounted RMR and have always thought comps were unneeded on anything less spicy than .38 Super, but the above is still a nice blaster.

Speed loaders: A vintage concept that never goes out of style

Going all the way back to the days of Rollin White’s revolutionary cylinder design of 1857, immortalized by two guys by the name of Smith and Wesson, the cartridge revolver that could be quickly reloaded has been a hit. Even though the detachable magazine semi-auto pistol was introduced just a few decades later, the wheel gun has endured and is still popular today.

The two largest publicly traded firearms companies in the U.S.– S&W, and Ruger– still have almost as many if not more revolver designs in production as they do semi-auto handguns. This is because the revolver is inherently simple, has few moving parts to master, can be very compact in snub nosed varieties, can bring the heat in large framed magnums, and a lot of people just plain old like ‘em.

With that being said, there is nothing that bars the average wheel gun user from stepping up their game when it comes to being able to rapidly reload an empty cylinder. This can be for fast and positive use on the range, competition, or in trimming the time needed to get back in the fight during a self-defense scenario.

Enter: The Speedloader

I do love a good old Colt

More in my column at Tac44.com

My 1960s EDC

Every now and then I like to channel the early Don Draper days with the below carry option.

It consists of a pre-71 Colt Detective Special in .38 SPL (stoked with period-correct standard velo 158 gr. soft lead SWC-HCs), a giant 1950s vintage Rosco-imported Mauro Mario Italian stiletto with Brazilian horn scales, a Bowers Kalamazoo Slide Sleeve lighter, Dr. Grabow Savoy imported Mediterranean briar pipe, and a custom steel pipe tamper. Not shown is the leather pipe pouch I use and the companion Bianchi IWB holster for the Colt snub.

All of the above inhabit the desk drawer in my office when not in use, and work just as well as the day they were created.

An 8-shot 357 and the .44Spl returns to Ruger’s wheelgun line

ruger-brings-new-caliber-options-to-revolver-line

Ruger announced Wednesday they will produce their well-loved double-action wheelguns in some new offerings including a 5-shot GP100 in .44 Special and an 8-shot .357 Mag Redhawk.

The GP 100, as detailed in the above video, has been around in a bunch of .357/.38 and .327 loadings, but that was about as beefy as it got. Now, some 30 years after its introduction, is being offered in a 5-shot .44 Special with a three-inch barrel.

I’ve always been a fan of the .44Spl and for about half a decade carried a Charter Arms Pug as my CCW piece.

The once-vaunted .44 Special dates back to before World War I but fell out of favor after Elmer Keith campaigned successfully for his hard-hitting .44 Magnum in the 1950s. With just a few manufacturers marketing new revolvers chambered in the easier handling but still effective .44 Special by the 1990s, the round seemed to be staring into the abyss. Now, with modern self-defense loads (Hornady Critical Defense, Speer Gold Dot, et. al) upping the ante on what the near cult-status round brings to the table, the new Ruger offering will no doubt be popular with .44 Specialists.

MSRP is $829 but you can expect prices at your dealer or online to be closer to $700, and if I like how it handles at SHOT Show, I may be a huckleberry.

Another new entry from Ruger is a .357 Magnum variant of the Redhawk, which hasn’t been offered since 1991. Best yet, the cylinder has been reworked to accommodate 8 cartridges, which brings a whole new element to the famous “Feel Lucky Punk?” scene.

ruger-redhawk-8-shot-357-relieved-cylinder-for-moon-clips

The new 8-shooter, which still fits in standard Redhawk holsters, comes with 3 full moon clips for its relieved cylinder and a 2.75-inch barrel. MSRP is a respectable $1079.

More info (including vids) are in my column at Guns.com.

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