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Just a gimmick or what?

Behold, the Full Conceal M3.

Just 3.6-inches high when folded, the M3 uses a 21-round Magpul PMAG GL9 magazine to fill in for part of the grip when extended. The modified frame utilizes a folding trigger safety that prevents the trigger bar from moving and engaging the sear, a feature that Full Conceal bills as leaving the gun safe to carry with a round chambered, even in the folded position.

They were vaporware for the past year but are now shipping for a four-figure price point.

Of course, folding guns aren’t anything new.

There was always the Japanese Type 1 Paratrooper rifle, which sucked, and the Hotchkiss Universal which was a better idea, and the Burgess folding shotgun, which is downright weird.

The Hotchkiss SMG

The Burgess

The Japanese Paratrooper

And today there is even the XAR Invicta folding rifle

But none of these are a handgun, such as the Full Conceal.

Thoughts? Comments? Concerns?

Marines go Glock

The Glock 19M won a 2016 award from the FBI to provide agents with a decent duty handgun in 9mm with a number of features that were different from the Gen4 G19, such as lack of fingergrooves on the grip, a flared magwell, and other misc internal changes. The 19M, with a few tweaks, became the Glock Gen5 G19 which hit the market a couple months back.

Now, it seems like the Marines have piggybacked on the FBI contract and have acquired 400 19Ms (dubbed, and no this is serious– the M007) to equip members of HMX-1– the famous “Marine One” unit responsible for the transportation of the President and other dignitaries– as well as military and civilian investigators of the Marine Corps Criminal Investigation Division. This shouldn’t be too surprising as standard Glock 19s have been used by MARSOC units off and on for a couple years and they have had NSN numbers for a decade.

Some 19Ms are also reportedly headed to Afghanistan with 2MarDiv members who have a need to be armed in dangerous situations at all times– likely to help balance the odds in green-on-blue encounters.

More in my column at Guns.com.

 

Getting in touch with that flashlight technique

While weapon mounted lights are increasingly the norm, carrying around a broad selection of low/no-light shooting skills in your toolbox will keep you well-lit in even the darkest of situations.

Going back to the era of the old town watch of Colonial times, which employed men who were armed with a sword or polearm and a lantern, it has always been preferable for those wandering about in sometime perilous conditions to have both a weapon for self-defense and some portable illumination to know when to use it.

Today it is no different.

Woe is the EDC practitioner who carries a defensive handgun without a light and no access to one on their person. Let’s face it, in your typical 365-day cycle, about half of that time is spent at night or in twilight, while the prospect of our species, as predominantly urban dwellers, to be thrown into pitch dark at high noon as we move about our homes or offices– due to a simple thrown light switch or power outage– has never been higher.

The Neck/eye/cheek Index flashlight technique, one of six that I cover after the jump

More in my column at Tac.44.com

 

The ticking time bomb that is the recoil spring

It is hard to beat a Glock of any generation when it comes to reliability, but it comes as a shock to many that inside their slide hides a pitfall to the whole program that the savvy polymer pistol user can easily overcome.

Like a 5,000 round failure point…

One of these things are not like the other– but both need to be evaluated at/near the 5K mark! Here we see a Gen 3 Glock 19 factory recoil spring assembly compared to one for a gen 4 Glock 22

The standard Glock factory guide rods are (this should come as no surprise to you) made from polymer. While low-cost and easy to produce, these plastic guide rods can chip, crack or break resulting in feeding or ejection failures. Further, these guide rods flex to a degree when in operation, which many argue will contribute to accuracy problems due to poor consistency. Finally, they have been known to snap, leaving the pistol inoperable. This weak link can be alleviated by putting some heavy metal into the mix.

More in my column at Tac.44.com

If you follow the pew-pew life, but don’t carry a blowout kit, there is something wrong with your love story

One thing often tragically neglected by people who think they are prepared is the ability to respond to a serious causality incident, where a trauma kit and some knowledge of how to use it can save lives– even your own.

If the terrible events of the past several days have proven anything is that you can expect the unexpected to rear its horrible head when and where you least anticipate. In a world of domestic and international terrorism, if you live, work or play near a large city you can quickly find yourself in the middle of a nightmare where overtaxed first responders may not be available or are stretched too thin to control the situation until additional resources appear. On the opposite side of the coin, in a rural or suburban area where a small-scale accident or incident pops off, you could find yourself isolated with the nearest support vital minutes or even hours away. It’s these moments, where conventional civilian emergency medicine protocols fail, that are the most dangerous.

Thus, the need to be ready for trauma.

More in my column at Tac.44.com.

One of these things is not like the other…or is it?

Just got my hot little hands on S&W’s new M&P 2.0 Compact in 9mm, which Smith plans on pitting against the always-popular (in polymer pistol circles) Glock 19.

Going through the specs, the Compact uses a 4-inch barrel and has a 15+1 round capacity in 9mm and 13+1 in the .40 variant with an unloaded weight of just under 24-ounces. This is a dead ringer in comparison to the Glock 19 and 23 and a hair lighter than the 26-ounce P-10 C series from Czech gun maker CZ.

I plan on having fun shooting them head-to-head and I have already found things I like about it over the Glock, though it does have a few thorns.

The old loaded chamber arguement

Ever since the first repeating handguns hit the market, the debate has ensued on carrying said hog leg on a loaded chamber

Most will say that carrying with an empty chamber is like saying you will have enough time to put on a seat belt in the second before you get in a car crash.

But in some cases, it may be a good idea…

The subject from both sides of the argument in my column at Tac44.com.

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