Basic bicycle repair class, Normandy edition, 75 yrs ago today

Canadian Army Pvt. R.O. Potter of The Highland Light Infantry of Canada repairs a flat tire on his bicycle shortly after the Allied D-Day landings in Normandy. France. 20 June 1944.

Note the No. 4 Mk I Enfield .303 and skrimmed helmet

Both the British and Canadian Army had issued their soldiers bicycles for the initial landings (Operation Neptune) on 6 June 1944 to help the soldiers get off of the beaches quickly and allow for more mobility during the ensuing Battle of Normandy (Operation Overlord).

Infantrymen of the Highland Light Infantry of Canada cook a meal aboard a landing craft en route to France amidst piles of bikes. (Photo: Library and Archives Canada)

Personnel of the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade landing on “Nan White” beach on D-Day

Personnel of the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade landing on “Nan White” (Juno) beach on D-Day. Whole lotta bikes in the sand. (Photo: Library and Archives Canada)

looking east along the “Nan White” beach, showing personnel of the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade landing on D-Day

looking east along the “Nan White” beach, showing personnel of the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade landing on D-Day. (Photo: Library and Archives Canada)

 

D-DAY – BRITISH FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (B 5078) Troops from the British 3rd Infantry Division, some with bicycles, move inland from Queen beach, Sword Area, 6 June 1944. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205818

D-DAY – BRITISH FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (BU 1184) Film still showing commandos of No. 4 Commando, 1st Special Service Brigade, coming ashore from LCI(S) landing craft on Queen Red beach, Sword area, 6 June 1944. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205373104

D-DAY – BRITISH FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (B 5003) Beach Group troops wade ashore from landing craft on Queen beach, Sword area, on the evening of 6 June 1944. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205090225

Although we here in the States often see D-Day as an Omaha Beach main event and Utah Beach sideshow, the fact is that of 160,000 Allied troops to hit Normandy on 6 June, half were British and Canadians. This included around 24,970 men of the British 50th Division (Northumbrian) and elements of the 8th Armored Brigade on Gold Beach, 21,400 Canucks of the 3rd Canadian Division on Juno Beach, 28,845 men of the British 3rd Infantry Division and 1st Special Service (Commando) Brigade on Sword Beach, along with 7,900 airborne troops of the British 6th Airborne Div with attached 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion.

By July 4, a cool million Allied troops were ashore and looking to break out, many on two wheels.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.