Indy’s S&W .455 up for auction

Remember this scene? Of course, you do.

Well, that big honking .455 is up for grabs.

“Known as The Bapty, this revolver was used by Indiana Jones throughout the production of the motion picture Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark. Raiders of the Lost Ark is the first movie in the adventure film series made famous in the early 80?s by creator George Lucas, director Steven Spielberg, and actor Harrison Ford. Featuring serial number 37891, this revolver is a British contract Smith and Wesson Hand Ejector MKII revolver. Chambered in .455 Webley, the gun had been altered to fire blanks for safety on the movie set. This revolver was carefully selected and uniquely modified prior to the start of filming. The barrel was cut from six inches to four and a custom one of a kind Baughman-style steel front sight was installed. A patina was applied to the factory bluing to offer it the well worn look we would expect of the gun carried by the famous adventurer. It features Smith and Wesson factory diamond patterned walnut grips with gold medallion inlays. A standard lanyard ring sits underneath the frame.

This is one of two revolvers used by Ford during the production of Raiders. The second revolver, known as The Stembridge, was briefly used during the scenes where filming took place in the United States. The majority of Raiders was filmed overseas where Indy carried The Bapty. It is accepted that The Bapty was used in all Raiders scenes where Indy fired his revolver, including the Ravenwood Bar shootout, the infamous shooting of the Cairo Swordsman, the gunfight in the streets of Tunisia, and the rescuing of Marion Ravenwood from the nazis.

Bapty Limited was the armourer who supplied this revolver to the production crew. It sat safely in their vault from the time production wrapped in September of 1980 until it was sold at auction in 2006. Accompanying this revolver is a signed letter from Bapty Limited stating its authenticity.”

Price? $5 Mill, which is probably a bit higher than anything I would have pegged it at, especially being that it is deactivated.

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