Like the Original, but Worse

In July 1879, the Royal Small Arms Factory at Enfield was ordered to produce a self-extracting revolver to compete against foreign models for an upcoming British Army test. Enfield’s first handgun, it was accepted, but soon found “a clumsy weapon” and, within a decade was replaced by a Webley-pattern break top design.

The mighty Webley .455 Mark VI, seen here at the Berman Museum in Anniston, Alabama with an aftermarket Pritchard-Greener bayonet, was the standard British Army revolver of the Great War-era. (Photo: Chris Eger)

For the next almost 50 years, Webley had a lock on the British sidearm trade but, in 1932, this changed after Enfield was ordered to cough up a second revolver design in a short-cased .38 caliber chambering, and did so with a model that looked a lot like the Webley.

The Enfield No. 2 was born and was soon made worse by the Enfield No. 2 Mk. 1* standard.

More in my column at Guns.com.

One comment

  • Worth noting, that while the standard Smith and Wesson Round nose is less powerful than an anemic .380 loading, Buffalo Bore now sells ammo for the .38/200 that turns out performance closely akin to .38 Special, making it much more suitable for personal defense. I’ve had this revolver for thirty plus years and enjoy shooting it a couple of times a year. It is quite accurate and now, with the Buffalo Bore ammo, a more versatile arm.
    Thank you for this website, I enjoy reading your eclectic collection of articles.

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