Tag Archives: Fallschirmjäger

Panzers, rolling

Some 20 years ago this month, the largest deployment of the German Bundeswehr since it was established in 1955 got underway. With United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 adopted on 10 June 1999, what became known as KFOR, some 50,000-strong, was soon stood up. Of these, 8,500 came from Germany and the force included both heavy and light armor as well as mountain (Gebirgsjäger) and parachute (Fallschirmjäger) units, the first time such detachments saw use in the Balkans since 1945.

Soldier of the Panzer Grenadier battalion 112 on a Marten AFV. On June 12., 1999

A convoy of German KFOR troops during the move into Prizren, Kosovo.

German Fallschirmjäger 1999 KFOR, note the newly-adopted HK G36

Prizren sniper overwatch KFOR June 1999, German Scharfschütze mit dem G22, an Accuracy International AWM with matched Zeiss 3–12×56mm glass

A convoy of several Leopard 2 A4 MBTs drives out of the camp at the airfield. KFOR

Strassenszene in Prizren – Waffenträger Wiesel der Fallschirmjäger. You have to love a Wiesel.

A TPZ Fox secures the bridge to the Prizren, Kosovo, old town area near the iconic Sinan Pasha Mosque, the latter built in 1615 by the Ottomans. (November 1999).

Ein Kampfpanzer Leopard 2 A5 in destroyed village near Nasec.

Ein Kampfpanzer Leopard 2 A5 in destroyed village near Nasec.

In the past 20 years, 135,000 Germans have taken part in KFOR operations, and 70 are still deployed today.

Speaking of VE-Day

Here is past Combat Gallery Sunday artist Alex Colville with his haunting painting, Tragic Landscape (oil on canvas 61 x 91 cm, painted in 1945) depicting a fallen German Fallschirmjäger in the tail end of the war, who has already been picked clean of his boots.

Alex Colville, Tragic Landscape German paratrooper 1944

Beaverbrook Collection of War Art. Canadian War Museum 19710261-2126

A Canadian military combat artist who landed in France in August 1944 and worked his way into Germany largely on foot, to Buchenwald and beyond, Colville saw the war up close and personal.

“I remember the paratrooper lying in a [Deventer] field,” recalled Colville in a 1980 interview. “He was about twenty. They [the Germans] would fight right to the very end; they had put up a tremendous fight until they were all killed.”