Tag Archives: precision rifle

So long Ozzie Hi-Powers…

The Australian government last week announced a sweeping new series of small arms to equip the Australian Defense Force, with SIG Sauer winning big.

As part of the Australian military’s $500 million LAND 159 Lethality System Project, the new outlay includes contracts to supply new sniper rifles, pistols, shotguns, personal defense weapons, and fighting knives to the ADF.

Replacing the island continent’s long-serving Browning Hi-Power Mk3s– one of the last Commonwealth countries still using the venerable old 13-shot single-action classic– will be the SIG Sauer P320 XCarry Pro. It is not the first military contract the XCarry has pulled down, in 2018 Denmark chose the pistol to replace the Swiss-made SIG P210 single-stacks used in that Scandinavian country for more than 70 years.

The SIG Sauer P320 XCarry Pro has been selected as the Royal Australian Army’s platform for the Sidearm Weapon System, which will replace the venerable Browning Mk3 pistol. It will be complemented with SIG’s Romeo Elite reflex sights, and a SIG Foxtrot 2 white light illuminator. (Photo: Australian Defense Force)

And that’s just the beginning….

More in my column at Guns.com.

Sig’s CROSS gains weight for PRS

Sig’s newest addition to its CROSS bolt-action precision rifle family picks up some weight to clock in on the PRS circuit. 

On the rifle range at Sig’s Freedom Days event at the Ben Avery Shooting Center outside of Phoenix last week was an interesting new CROSS model that only went “live” with Sig on Thursday.  

The new PRS model rifle differs from the standard CROSS as it has a bull barrel, a redesigned stainless steel buttstock, a straighter pistol grip, and a full-length steel Arca rail on the bottom for bipod and tripod action. This takes the rifle up to 14.5-pounds, which is quite a weight gain from the CROSS’s typical 6.5-pound range, but the original series is meant for hunting and tactical use in the field whereas the new CROSS PRS is more for Precision Rifle Series matches where extra heft isn’t a bad thing– so long as it helps with accuracy. 

Even at 14.5 pounds and fitted with a can and some decent glass, the CROSS PRS has a good balance to it. (Photo: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

More in my column at Guns.com.

Finns Roll Their own AR-10s for DMR, Sniper Work

The Finnish military, a force long renowned for its snipers– has selected the M23 series rifle from Sako for precision work.

Sako, a historic Finnish rifle manufacturer that recently celebrated its 100th anniversary, has a long connection to the country’s sharpshooters. Samo Haya, widely regarded as “the world’s deadliest sniper,” used a Sako-made Mosin M/28 during the country’s 1939-40 Winter War with the Soviet Union.

Sako’s new M23 AR-10 platform, frolicking in the Karelian forests. (Photo: Finnish Defense Force)

The new rifle, based on the AR-10/SR-25 style platform, is the Sako-made M23 in 7.62 NATO. It will be fielded in two formats, the Kivääri 23 (KIV 23) — a designated marksman rifle for use in infantry squads– and the Tarkkuuskivääri 23 (TKIV 23), a dedicated sniper rifle, with the differences largely being in the optics. Both guns are shown in Finnish Army photos with Steiner glass, no surprise as both Sako and Steiner are owned by Beretta.

The M23 will replace the Finnish Army’s aging Cold War-era Dragunov marksman rifles and the newer TKIV 85 bolt-action sniper rifle, the latter a much-upgraded Mosin action. Both legacy platforms are chambered in 7.62x54R.

The KIV 23 variant is for use as a DMR at the squad and platoon level, replacing the Dragunov SVD. It is expected to mount an LPVO and is intended for use to 600 meters. (Photo: Finnish Defense Force)

Meanwhile, the Sako TKIV 23, outfitted with a Steiner M7Xi 2.9–20×50, will replace an accurized Finnish-made Mosin, the TKIV 85, in a sniper role out to 800 meters. (Photo: Finnish Defense Force)

The upside of this is the possibility that we could see a high-quality AR-10 from Finland imported via Beretta USA’s channels at some point. Which is a win for everybody, I think.