Tag Archives: 92X Compact

So I have been carrying the Beretta 92X Compact for 2 months…

I’ve have been shooting and carrying one of Beretta’s newest versions of their iconic Model 92, the 92X, and have a few things to report.

While the standard/full-sized 92X uses a 4.7-inch barrel to produce an 8.5-inch long handgun that tips the scales at 33.4-ounces while unloaded, the smaller Centurion is a more Commander-style offering with a shorter 4.25-inch barrel which boils down to a 7.75-inch overall length.

Going even shorter, the 92X Compact has the Centurion-length slide and barrel on a shorter frame (5.25-inches high, versus the standard 5.4-inch) to produce a handgun more suited for concealed carry. This puts the Compact in roughly the same class, size-wise, as guns such as the Glock G19, Sig Sauer P229, and S&W M&P M2.0 Compact.

I have carried it for over 400 hours and ran 2,000 rounds in it drawn from a selection of loads from Winchester, Federal, CCI (Blazer), Wolf, and PMC in weights between 115- and 147-grain with a mix of various training and self-defense ammo in standard commercial, military, and +P velocities.

Long story short: one malfunction in shooting, some belly skin lost in carry. Other than that, not bad. Not bad at all.

In the end, the 92X gives the modern shooter a reliable handgun that stands on 40+ years of legacy while having a lot of features– DA/SA hammer-fired action, all-metal construction, slide-mounted safety/decocker– that you aren’t going to find on the average plastic fantastic.

Further, it does it all in three available sizes with a ton of aftermarket support. The 92X series may not get people to drop their polymer striker-fired handguns, but it does give those who are familiar with, or prefer, the 92 families a more contemporary pistol that is both fun to shoot and dependable.

See the full review with more context in my column at Guns.com

Back-to-Back Gulf War Winner, updated

Beretta has been around for at least 400 years, with a lot of that in the handgun market. The M1951 popped up the days immediately after WWII and became a crowd-favorite not only in Italy but around the globe for a generation. Then came the Model 92 in the 1970s, which took all the lessons learned from the ’51 and made good on the design, primarily making it a double stack.

It is a good design, seeing much service.

Fast forward 40 years and the 92 spent most of that as the standard sidearm of the U.S. military– and will likely take another generation or so to be totally replaced by the new M17/M18 pistols if the past experience with the M1911 is taken as an example.

However, even though Beretta has introduced more modern polymer-framed handguns (APX, anyone?) they show no sign of putting the vaunted 92 to bed anytime soon. In fact, they are updating it.

For the past month, I have been shlepping this bad boy around.

Recently introduced by the Italian gunmaker, the 92X series is a wholly American concept, produced at their Gallatin, Tennessee plant. Introduced in July in Full-Sized, Centurion and Compact variants– the latter both with and without an accessory rail– the new handgun line is loaded with features and upgrades not found in the more vanilla 92FS/M9 pistols while coming in at a price that is more affordable than the M9A3 and the semi-custom Langdon Tactical/Wilson Combat 92G series guns.

So far, I have put about 600 rounds through this T&E 92X Compact and have carried it for about 150 hours. How does it stack up against other popular mid-sized carry guns in size?

Not too bad, right? Interestingly, the loaded weight difference between these two is only about an ounce apart…

More in my column at Guns.com.

A Brace of Berettas

Tullio Marengoni developed an innovative locked-breech pistol for Beretta in the late 1940s as the company was restructuring following WWII. Borrowing the open-slide format of the earlier 9mm Glisenti M1923, his much more modern design reached the market as the M1951 (or just 951) and only reached full production in 1956.

The single stack 9mm led to the Brigadier and other variants then, with some further growth and a conversion to a double stack, became Beretta’s Model 92 in the early 1970s (although it should be pointed out that the 951 is still very much in active production and use in Third World countries today).

Fast forward to this week, and Beretta has introduced the latest tranche of the Model 92 series, the 92X during a “Pistol Summit” held this week for a few select gun media folks– somehow including your’s truly.

The four new Beretta 92X pistols all use the “thin” Vertec profile frame, but are still backward compatible with legacy 92 parts. Top left to right: the railed Compact; Centurion; (rail-less) Compact, and, bottom, is the 92X Full-Size (All Photos: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

The four new Beretta 92X pistols all use the “thin” Vertec profile frame, but are still backward compatible with legacy 92 parts. Top left to right: the railed Compact; Centurion; (rail-less) Compact, and, bottom, is the 92X Full-Size (All Photos: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

Built on the Vertec profile frame with a straight backstrap and updated grip options, the guns all feature a round trigger guard, beveled magazine well, chrome-lined barrel with a recessed target crown, front and back cross checkering on the grip frame, and combat sights with dovetailed fronts. The guns use a steel trigger and mag release.

To understand where the new handgun line falls inside Beretta’s expansive Model 92 line, the 92X series is loaded with features and upgrades not found in the more vanilla 92FS/M9 pistols while coming in at a price that is more affordable than the M9A3 and the semi-custom Langdon Tactical/Wilson Combat 92G series guns.

And they shoot great.

More in my column at Guns.com.