Tag Archives: B&T

For those Special times, when you don’t want to Wake the neighbors

The Swiss firm of Brugger & Thomet, today just known by the catchier B&T, has long specialized in fairly unique gear for Mil/LE use, primarily in Europe.

Well, as B&T is now a thing in the U.S, based in Tampa, Florida (within spitting distance of USSOCOM headquarters at MacDill AFB), they have been bringing lots of their designs to American shores with a bit of success. For instance, the Army recently chose B&T USA’s APC9K for its small-batch Sub Compact Weapon (SCW) program, which the USAF has doubled down on.

This brings us to the Special Purpose Rifle (SPR) 300, a compact SBR with a 10-inch barrel and integral suppressor that has a folding stock and can be stowed in a backpack.

Chambered in .300 Whisper, it has reportedly been a hit (see what I did there) with European counter-terror units.

Updated for the U.S. market, the new SPR300 PRO, in .300 Blackout, has a Timney trigger and, in true American fashion, now accepts AR mags.

More in my column at Guns.com.

Welrod Redux

If you are a fan of guns, you know what this bad boy is:

Yup, the almost totally suppressed .32 ACP Welrod pistol, designed at Station IX by the SOE’s Inter-Services Research Bureau during WWII.

In 2014, Swiss gun maker Brugger & Thomet introduced the VP-9, or Veterinary Pistol 9, a gun that was designed much along the Welrod’s lines and intended for limited use for humane field euthanasia in extremis.

The BT VP9. Can you say, “polymer Welrod?”

Fast forward to this week and the company, now rebranded over here as B&T USA– and with Army and USAF sub-gun contracts under their belt— has come clean that the VP9 was created back in the day for a “special user” then marketed to cow and horse docs since the R&D was already done.

Better yet, they have a new and improved version they intend to offer to the consumer market in 2021, NFA rules apply.

The name? Station 6. Get it (Station IX)?

Boom

More in my column at Guns.com.

USAF Goes B&T

Last Spring, the U.S. Army announced they would be buying a small quantity (~350) of Sub Compact Weapons, ultra-compact 9mm SMGs for use by the special teams tasked with protecting high-value officers and dignitaries. The first decent sub-gun contract by the Pentagon this century, there were lots of bragging rights on the line and 10 different companies both foreign and domestic threw their hats in the ring, with Swiss-based B&T coming out the winner with their downright tiny APC9K.

Well, the USAF just jumped on the same train last month, ordering a smaller quantity, likely for similar uses.

After all, could you blame them?

More in my column at Guns.com.

That looks like a fun toy

The Swiss firm of Brugger & Thomet a few years ago coughed up a neat little SMG termed the Advanced Police Carbine, or APC. Nominally a pistol-caliber burp gun that can top 1,080 rounds-per-minute the company beat out a Baker’s Dozen of big-name gun makers last year with a shortened version, the APC9K, to win an Army contract to replace the HK MP5K in use with Personal Security Details guarding key command staff like SACEUR and UNC/CFC/USFK.

The HK MP5K, perfect for close protection, but an aging design that takes proprietary mags. (Photo: U.S. Army)

The new B&T APC9K is trim and, importantly, can take Sig P320 mags– which are used by the Army’s new M17/M18 pistols.

I got to handle one lately.

The APC9K, in what is dubbed a PRO series, is a semi-auto and is seeing some success on the law enforcement market for specialized services, such as when suppressed in the hands of an entry team in a meth lab.

Miami Beach just selected the B&T APC9K PRO this month. More on that in my column at Guns.com. 

 

SCW, anyone?

Earlier this year, Brugger & Thomet won the Army’s Sub Compact Weapon contract to supply up to 1,000 very short SMGs to DOD for use by security details. The gun had to be ambidextrous, very compact — under 15-inches overall with some sort of provision for a stock — and light. For reference, the very short HK MP5K, with no allowance for a stock, is 12.9-inches.

The winner: B&T’s APC9K, which has a 13.6-inch overall length with the stock fully collapsed. Further, the receiver can be made in a variant that accepts Sig P320 pattern mags, and keep in mind the Army just adopted that pistol as the M17/M18.

The B&T APC9K will almost fit in the palm of your hand– if you have really big hands. (Photos: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

The B&T APC9K will almost fit in the palm of your hand– if you have really big hands. (Photos: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

More in my column at Guns.com

The Army went Swiss to replace German

Swiss gun maker B&T had a very short Trident Arms-marked APC9K-SD model on hand at SHOT Show earlier this year that looked like a contender for the Army’s Sub Compact Weapon program, a move to buy up to 1,000 handy room brooms to replace aging HK MP5s used by personal security details.

This thing. Of note, everyone else that has written about B&T’s SCW entry is using pictures of a different gun, because they didn’t take this one. (Photo: Chris Eger)

It turns out to have been at the head of the pack, minus the integral suppressor.

More in my column at Guns.com

 

What is an SCW and how is it changing the new guns on the market?

Last June, the U.S. Army tapped first 10 and then a total of 13 companies for what it termed “Sub Compact Weapons.” These guns, “capable of engaging threat personnel with a high volume of lethal and accurate fires at close range with minimal collateral damage,” were to be used by the military’s Personal Security Details, special teams tasked with protecting high-value officers and dignitaries such as the SACEUR and the commander of U.S. Forces Korea– each likely an endangered species in the hours prior to the balloon going up in those regions.

The Heckler & Koch MP5 submachine gun of U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Samuel Caines, assigned to the Supreme Allied Commander Europe Security Detachment, ejects a bullet casing at the Training Support Center Benelux 25-meter indoor range in Chièvres, Belgium, Oct. 22, 2015. (U.S. Army photo by Visual Information Specialist Pierre-Etienne Courtejoie/Released)

Well, that didn’t work out and the Army trimmed the field a bit in September with a tough series of requirements (a weapon shorter than 15-inches overall when stowed but still ready to fire in such a position, weight less than 5-pounds, etc) and just six companies were able to get in on that. While a small contract, likely to run 350 to 1,000 guns, the bragging rights to replace the long-standard HK MP5 would be huge.

While little details about what models were ultimately submitted for review by the Army, several new SCW-ish guns were in the aisles of the 41st annual SHOT Show in Las Vegas last week, and they are pretty swag.

More in my column at Guns.com.

 

Some things never go out of style

Exotic Swiss arms maker Brügger & Thomet is probably best known for their MP9 series firearms, but have you “heard” of their VP9?

The manually-operated VP9 (veterinary pistol, 9mm) is meant for humane euthanasia by large animal vets in the field and has an integrated suppressor that they bill as the “most quiet pistol in this calibre on the market.”

With a five-shot magazine, it only has two moving parts and at 11.25-inches overall length with its largest can, is about the size of an M1911, though is much quieter. Like classic Welrod (a British WWII design it favors that also used internal wipes) quiet. It sucks that rubber wipes are considered by ATF to be “silencer parts” over here, which makes it rough for U.S. suppressor makers to come up with comparable designs as its impractical to repack these old-school cans on a regular basis.

In the above video by 5.11, they visit B&T AG and talk with Reto Flutsch (that name, tho) and go loud quiet with a VP9.

For more on it’s grandpa, check out the video from Ian with Forgotten Weapons, below.