Tag Archives: canadian rangers

A closer look at Canada’s most niche survival rifle

Meant primarily for emergency hunting and fending off polar bears rather than parting the hair of a Russian submariner, the C19 rifle is definitely unique to the needs of those that use it.

In the above video members of the Canadian Rangers are shown in Newfoundland meeting their newly issued .308 Win-chambered bolt guns for the first time and getting the 411 on nomenclature and the rifle’s specifics. Based on the Sako T3 CTR (Compact Tactical Rifle) with tweaks for the Rangers as they have to use their guns in whiteout conditions at -50 C weather.

The cold weather testing, by Colt Canada, who is making the C19 under license from Sako.

Said differences include an oversize bolt and trigger guard so that it can be used with heavy gloves (you don’t want to touch metal with bare hands when it’s that cold) as well as a high-viz laminated stock complete with the Ranger crest.

More on the C19 over in my Guns.com column.

Rangers can still make their Enfields sing

With their vintage .303 No. 4 Lee Enfield rifles being phased out, the part-time soldiers of the Canadian Rangers are standing tall at the Canadian Armed Forces Small Arms Concentration.

The military shooting competition, in which some 450 shooters from Canada’s Regular Force and Primary Reserve, Canadian Ranger Patrol Groups, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and teams from the United Kingdom and the United States are competing, was first organized back in 1868.

Held from September 5 to 17 at the Connaught Ranges and Primary Training Centre in Ottawa, it will be one of the final competitive shooting competitions in which the Canadian Rangers will use the Enfield, which is being replaced by the Sako/Colt Canada T3 CTR (Compact Tactical Rifle) rifle in .308.

While the Canucks plan to destroy surplus Enfields left after the conversion, those Rangers currently with them will be gifted their guns.

(Photos: Corporal Doug Burke/Canadian Forces Joint Imagery Center)

Note the Enfield competition belts to hold spare mags (Photos: Corporal Doug Burke/Canadian Forces Joint Imagery Center)

(Photos: Corporal Doug Burke/Canadian Forces Joint Imagery Center)

(Photos: Corporal Doug Burke/Canadian Forces Joint Imagery Center)

The below video from the Canadian Army, which shows some No. 4s at work at the Small Arms Concentration, details Sergeant Cyril Abbott of the 5th Canadian Ranger Patrol Group. Abbott served 20 years active with the Black Watch and 2 RCR, and has spent the past 32 years with the Rangers, giving him an impressive 52 years with the Colours.

Meet the new C19 rifle of the Great North

RE27-2015-0236-08 Members of the 1 Canadian Ranger Patrol Group perform target practice with the new C-19 Canadian Ranger rifle at the rifle range in Inuvik, Northwest Territories during Op NANOOK 2015, 17 August. The rifle model currently used is the Lee Enfield. While the stock of rifles now in use are excellent tools for an Arctic environment, their replacement with modern rifles is an exciting historical moment and are being used for the first time by the Canadian Rangers in Canada during Operation NANOOK 2015.

RE27-2015-0236-08 Members of the 1 Canadian Ranger Patrol Group perform target practice with the new C-19 Canadian Ranger rifle at the rifle range in Inuvik, Northwest Territories during Op NANOOK 2015, 17 August. The rifle model currently used is the Lee Enfield. While the stock of rifles now in use are excellent tools for an Arctic environment, their replacement with modern rifles is an exciting historical moment and are being used for the first time by the Canadian Rangers in Canada during Operation NANOOK 2015.

The C-19 is based on the Sako T3 CTR (Compact Tactical Rifle) but, seeing as the Rangers have to use their guns in whiteout conditions at -50 C weather, their version has an oversized bolt and trigger guard so that it can be used with heavy gloves (you don’t want to touch metal with bare hands when its that cold) as well as a high-viz laminated stock complete with the Ranger crest.

These 10-shot .308s are replacing the elderly SMLE in Ranger use.

And in a twist, the rifle will be made under license by Colt Canada. This means that, while Colt in the U.S. fights to stave off bankruptcy, its Canadian arm will be looking to hire as many as 30 new employees.

Canada Stalls on New Ranger Rifles

The frozen far north of the continent, most of it above the Arctic Circle, is patrolled by a group of part time soldiers known as the Canadian Rangers. This force of some 5,000 volunteer locals are armed with rifles that in some cases date to the First World War. Canada is now crawfishing on buying them new guns for budgetary reasons.
Read the rest in my column at Firearms Talk.com

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