Tag Archives: glock carry

Thinking about EDC with your Glock

My current "winter" EDC: Gen 3 Glock 19 in Galco Royal Guard inside the waistband holster, cheapo Cree LED light (they work well, are adjustable and are inexpensive if you lose them), Skallywag Gladium knife, extra mag.

My current “winter” EDC: Gen 3 Glock 19 in Galco Royal Guard inside the waistband holster, cheapo Cree LED light (they work well, are adjustable and are inexpensive if you lose them), Skallywag Gladium knife, extra mag.

With a dozen states now codifying the right to possess a concealed handgun without a permit and over 15 million license holders from coast to coast, there has never been a better time to practice every day carry.

A true EDC is one you are 110 percent comfortable with keeping 366 days per year. It is your “get out of trouble” escape plan translated into mechanical format. By pairing that one sidearm with its dedicated holster and accessories, you are making a statement in reliability. You trust that device in any situation, without reserve.

However, if you have a Glock, there are a few things to keep in mind.

The rest in  my column at Tac.44.com

Glock bathroom etiquette 101: Or, how to avoid looking like a fool

In the past week, there has been a plethora of stories popping up in the traditional media, much to the delight of anti-gun groups, of Glock owners/users having bathroom malfunctions with their guns. To address this and make sure we are all on the same page keep reading.

If you conceal carry outside the home, which if you live in every state except New Jersey, California, Hawaii, Maryland, Delaware and a handful of other may-issue territories, is fairly easy to do, you owe it to yourself and those around you to observe the ten commandments of going number 1 or number 2 while armed.

A U.S. Capitol Police agent's Glock 27 left behind when he exited his stall...yikes

A U.S. Capitol Police agent’s Glock 27 left behind when he exited his stall…yikes

1. Try to go before you go
2. If you find yourself having to go while on the go, try to hold it until you get back home.
3. Should #1 and #2 fail you, locate an actual restroom if possible.
4. Look for a single-person room if available.
5. If you can’t, pick the stall with your strong hand (weapon side) against the wall. Wait for it if you can.
6. Get in touch with your holster options to help ensure that you don’t always have to draw your firearm in public to disrobe.
7. There are always shoulder holsters…one of the best reasons to rock the Miami Vice look. I know a gentleman CCW carrier who has IBS/Crohn’s and carries in a shoulder rig specifically for this reason
8. If you have to unholster, remember your trigger discipline and muzzle control. Also, consider if you prefer Condition 1 or 2 carry.
9. Before leaving the stall, always physically touch your holster and grip, verifying that both are in the same place as when you entered the stall.
10. Visually check the stall as you are leaving, while rechecking commandment #9.
Open carriers largely have the same list of commandments, but also pick up the luxury of being able to use a Level II/III (or higher) retention holster since concealment is not a priority.

The rest in my column at Glock Forum