Tag Archives: new glock

Seems like everyone has a new .22LR pistol for 2020

Only a few weeks into 2020 and the domestic U.S. firearms market has seen a flood of new .22LR pistols from some of the biggest names in the business.

Last month saw the 42nd annual SHOT Show in Las Vegas where more than 2,600 exhibitors gathered from around the globe to display their freshest wares. When it came to rimfire handguns, there were lots of new faces in the aisles.

More in my column at Guns.com. 

Glock’s new pistol turned out to be a super reliable plinker

When it comes to .22LR, the biggest problem is the round itself.

First marketed in 1884 as a black powder round, the little lead-nosed pipsqueak was intended for use in rifles and revolvers, with its rimmed case proving notoriously difficult for pistols to cycle. Compounding this, there is a myriad of loads in circulation, all with slightly different specs and performance. When you magnify those problems with the fact that the rounds are often produced by the millions as economically as possible, especially in the case of bulk-pack budget ammo, and you get a cartridge that tends to be finicky in a lot of semi-auto handguns.

To get it right, Glock spent nearly three years testing and developing the G44– which is why models like the G45, G46, G47, and G48 passed it up in reaching the market while the rimfire chewer was still in R&D.

During that time, they used no less than 141 different rimfire loads in testing, popping over 1.2 million rounds in the process. Federal, which supported the effort, used everything in test guns from 42-grain subsonic to CCI Stingers with no problem. In short, while many 22LR pistols come with the caveat that they are picky about their diet, the Glock is billed as being omnivorous.

Well, I grabbed 2,200 rounds of a wide array of .22LR and headed to the range with a new G44 sent for T&E.

How did it do?

More in my column at Guns.com. 

In Glockspeak, the G44 is a 22LR pistol

The big reveal this week in Georgia, after much fanfare, turned out to be Glock’s first rimfire handgun– the G44.

The Glock Gen 5 G44, left, is the same size as the 9mm Gen 5 G19, right, but is chambered in .22LR (Photo: Chris Eger)

Chambered in 22LR, it is a dead ringer for the G19 in size (though not in weight) with the same surface controls and trigger. This makes it an ideal training gun. Similarly, it is reliable as all get out, being tested with over 140 different rimfire loads by Glock in a developmental process that went back more than five years– hence the fact that the G45, G46, G47, and G48 have beaten it to market.

Further, it is made by Glock, and not by Umarex or some other third company as many other handgun makers do.

I am currently testing one extensively and will get back to you guys ASAP.

Until then, check out my column at Guns.com for more info. 

CBP and the new Glock 47 (?)

Customs and Border Patrol, which existed for decades before they were merged Post-9/11 as the Dept. of Homeland Security’s CBP, loved six-shooters. Legendary smokewagon skinner Bill Jordan cut his chops as a Border Patrol officer/inspector in the 1930s and 40s before he helped invent the S&W M19 and M66 to give the .357 Magnum room to move.

Christine Davis (Gee) was the first female agent hired by US Border Patrol. She was a member of class 107, and graduated the academy on July 31, 1975. Note her S&W M19, which remained standard for another 20 years after this picture was taken

Therefore, it was no surprise that the agency was among the last federal law enforcement groups to ditch the wheelgun when in 1995 they adopted the Beretta 96 in .40S&W to put their M66’s to pasture. Then, in 2004, they moved from the all-metal Beretta to the polymer-framed HK P2000.

Dig those M14s tho (HK P-2000s in holsters)

Now, 15 years after the move to HK, the guns are still in frontline use, but have been passed up by a new generation of combat handguns and are as much of a throwback as the .357 six-shooter was in 1995.

Which compelled CBP to seek a replacement last year in a tender that specified an optics-ready handgun. This week they announced Glock got the nod to the tune of $85 million smackers, which is a lot of polymer (CBP has 45,000 LE officers and agents across all of its agencies).

The interesting thing about the move is that it appears they are the first adopter of the as-yet-to-be-announced Glock G47, which looks to be a G45 with a G17 MOS Gen 5 slide fitted.

I will be sure to check in with Glock for more info on that in the coming days.

Until then, check out my article on the move at Guns.com.

New Glock Slim models inbound

Meet the new 9mm 10+1 capacity Glock 43X and Glock 48. Two guns with the same frame, the 43X runs 6.06-inches long while the G48 is 6.85-inches (which makes it eligible for import to Canada) and yes, both are two-tone.

Sure to be the buzz of SHOT Show this month, the official release date is 21 January but most Glock retailers are already taking preorders for about $475~ in the standard models, $500 with Glock night sights and $575 with Ameriglos, although your mileage may vary.

Glock’s presser, released 2 January:

Today, GLOCK, Inc. announces two additions to the GLOCK pistol family. The GLOCK 43X and the GLOCK 48 feature the design of the Slimline series with a silver slide and are a perfect fit for everyday carry. Chambered in 9X19, both pistols feature a compact Slimiline frame with silver nPVD finish and a 10-round magazine capacity making them ideal for concealed carry.

“With the success of the Slimline series in the marketplace and over one million GLOCK 43 pistols sold in just three years, the Slimline series pistols have been tested, trusted and proven,” said GLOCK, Inc. VP Josh Dorsey. “We listened to the consumers request for a GLOCK Slimline model with increased round capacity and both of these pistols deliver that flawlessly. GLOCK’s continued pursuit of perfection drives innovation while not straying from our promise of reliability and durability and that is demonstrated in the G43X and G48.”

Designed for comfort, the G43X and G48 combine a fuller-size grip length with a minimal profile of approximately 1” for a comfortably balanced, versatile grip that’s ideal for a variety of users. While the two pistols share the same size frame, they have different slide lengths. The slide for the G43X is the same sub-compact length as the G43 (6.06 in.) while the G48 has a compact length (6.85 in) and is compliant with Canadian regulations.

These pistols incorporate elements of the Slimline series such as the short trigger distance, a frame with a built-in beavertail, a reversible magazine catch and the incredibly accurate, match-grade GLOCK Marksman Barrel (GMB). The G43X and G48 also feature precision-milled front serrations. Both models are available in three sight configurations; standard, GLOCK Night Sights (GNS), and Ameriglo BOLD.

Here is what people thought about them in a man-on-the-street that we did at Guns.com.

More to come, of course.

For those who always wanted a Glock 19…with just a little…more

Sure, 15 pieces of flair are the minimum but don’t you want to go 17, or 18, or even 19 or 20 when it comes to 9mm without giving up your slide length?

That’s where the new Glock 19X (eXtended capacity?) comes in.

It’s been hush-hush for awhile, but the basic concept is that it is a Gen 5 G19 upper with a modified Gen 5 G17 frame and some tweaked internals, which gives you a “1917” (1719?) concept of a Glock 19 with a full-sized grip and bump in mag capacity. It is also in a factory Coyote finish, comes with night sights, and lots of other neat-o add-ons like extended mags.

[Of course, I would prefer a G19 Frame with G26 grip and a G17 slide, which would give more sight radius while allowing better concealability while maintaining the ability to add a laser/light, and you could always use extended mags if you want more capacity, but hey, at least they have something to work on for 2019!]

I’ve been shooting it for the past couple weeks and have to say that I find it kinda groovy in a Colt Commander kind of way. Be sure to check out the first look piece over at Guns.com on it, and stay tuned for an in-depth review after I get a couple thou parabellums through it.

Wait till you see what they look like on the inside

Robbie with Wheaton Arms sat down with the Sootch00 YouTube gun channel and contrasted the new Glock Gen 5 against legacy Gen 4 and 3 models both inside and out.

There are actually a lot of differences.

Still, as when they introduced the Gen 4 and it went through a year of teething problems and stealth fixes, I’ll wait a year for the bugs to get worked out of the Gen 5.

Call me old-fashioned, but I am still a Gen 3 guy when it comes to my combat tupperware.

Glock Gen 5 G17 and G19 drop on the market this week

It looks boringly like every other Glock out there, but when you look closely, there are actually a number of subtle differences. Most notably, the polygonal rifling is out and traditional ballard-style rifling is in. Also, the fingergrooves, standard since the Gen 3, are a thing of the past. I do like the flared magwell, though, but for the record I will likely stick to the Gen3 G19 that I have been using for years. If it isn’t broke…

From Glock:

On August 30, GLOCK, Inc. will be announcing the launch of our new G17 Gen5 and G19 Gen5 pistols.

The G17 Gen5 and G19 Gen5 pistols were inspired by the GLOCK M pistols used by the FBI and include many features the GLOCK community has been asking for. There are over 20 design changes which differentiate our Gen5 pistols from their Gen4 predecessors, including a flared mag-well, a new nDLC finish, the GLOCK Marksman Barrel, ambidextrous slide stop levers, and a grip which has no finger grooves.

These pistols will be available at your favorite GLOCK dealer beginning August 30.

A shot of the Glock M (that the FBI is issuing with a finger grip sleeve!) :

Marketing slick for Glock dealers (from my local Glock dealer).

They expect to retail these in-shop for $539

Chris Bartocci talks more about the Gen5 barrels below.

Hello Glockness, Gen V

First Soldier Systems and then TFB chimed in with the new rumint on the Glock 17M as confirmed by Larry V and Tim Harmsen with the Military Arms Channel the new groove-less Gen 4+ model that has been selected to be the new FBI gun to replace their thousands of Gen 3 G22 .40S&W models.

Note the left thumb ambi slide stop

Note the left thumb ambi slide stop and a Gen 4 extended palm swell/beavertail back panel but no finger grooves on the front.

The images purportedly come from a member of the Indianapolis Police Dept who was shown the gun during in-service training which will likely make him really super duper popular with the instructor who pimped it out.

The TLR-1 is sweet, note the flared magwell absent from the above shot, also the belt keepers scream copshit, lending an air of cred to the whole thing

The TLR-1 is sweet, note the flared magwell seemingly absent from the above shot, as well as night sights– also the belt keepers scream copshit, lending an air of cred to the whole thing

Among the cooler points are a flared tactical/practical style magwell and G42 trigger, plus it has an ambi slide release as shown in the second image. All of this I predicted months ago, just saying.

From the webs:

“Currently at our handgun in-service, and the 17M info has been released to the guys here, so I feel comfortable putting it out here.
Changes are:
1. New, “tougher” finish
2. Different rifling
3. Longer RSA
4. Reinforced front RSA notch
5. Smoother trigger (similar to G42/G43)
6. Flared magwell
7. Removed finger grooves
8. Safety plunger is oblong/rectangular instead of round
9. Ambi slide release
10. Magazine well cut out
11. Magazines have a slightly extended front lip.”

Tim had one in testing before the news broke, and after the cat scrambled out of the bag, posted some really good pictures of the internals and dropped that the gun uses a traditional button rifled barrel with lands and grooves– a departure from Glock’s polygonal rifling– as well as advised the gun uses legacy G17 mags.

glock 17 m MAC

I’m sure there will be much more on these guns out there at SHOT in Jan 2017, and I will bring you what I find. Also, can you say Army Modular Handgun?

35 Years of 9mm Glocky transformation

The good folks over in Smyrna, Georgia have finally caught up to the pack that has been led by Ruger, Kahr, S&W, and Springfield Armory to produce a concealed carry piece that everyone has been wanting– the Glock 43.

pistole80
(This is how your standard Glock 9mm started off about 35 years ago– they’ve come a long way)

Back in the early 1980s, Gaston Glock introduced his revolutionary Pistole 80 for the review on a contract for new handguns for the Austrian Army. Beating out longtime supplier Steyr, Glock’s new gun was a polymer framed 9mm striker fired pistol with a double stack mag that held an impressive 17 rounds. After the Austrian military said, “Ja” on the new gun, Glock started to export these gems to the U.S. as the Glock 17– and the rest in history.

But you see in the past decade or so, while Glock was making millions of excellent duty guns, the other makers crept in and catered to those who wanted a decent concealed carry gun that was the holy grail of being slim and compact enough to where it was almost unnoticeable in every day carry while wearing normal clothes– while still having a large enough round to give a lot of confidence in.

Well this week, it looks like Glock decided to deliver an answer to those competitors.

Things change...

Things change…

The rest in my column at Firearms Talk

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