Tag Archives: SBR

The German MP5SD is so quiet all you hear is action

Machine Gun Mike breaks out a select-fire, suppressed HK MP5SD built by Urbach Precision and shows you why it’s so muffly.

It’s got all the goodies, being a suppressed SBR with both three-round burst and full-auto selector switch and on-board en-quieter that is capable of putting the hush on even super-sonic hardball. Yup, the MP5SD was developed by Heckler & Koch in 1976 for military commandos and was designed to allow standard NATO ball, already in service for subguns and handguns, to be used in the integrally suppressed little SD, but still be quiet enough to where mechanical action noise is all you hear.

Plus, the way the can is made, it is very effective at eliminating muzzle flash, making it a good choice not only for operators at night working by PNVs, but also in use by clandestine lab teams taking down meth labs with potentially lethal fumes– which is why you stumble on a lot of these that have been loaned by the feds to podunk local SWAT teams.

Perhaps the most unsung use of a MP5SD was in the Gambia.

You don’t have to look in this diplomatic pouch

The Gambia is the smallest independent country in mainland Africa. It gets its name from the River Gambia that cuts it in half. Independent since 1965 it is almost completely surrounded by its much larger neighbor Senegal which it was friendly with. In 1981 its population was slightly under a million and it did not even feel the need to have an army. The country’s president Sir Dawda Jawara was invited to attend the Royal Wedding of Prince Charles due to the Gambia’s status as a member of the British Commonwealth.

On July 31, 1981, 400 Marxist radicals under the name of The Movement for Justice in Africa that had been armed and trained in Libya took advantage of his absence to seize control of the country. In the capital city of Banjul they sized Jawara’s family, the radio station, police armory and airport. President Jawara declared he would return to his country and asked for British help. He was given a British Army force of two men. These two men were not your average soldiers, they were SAS men.

Margaret Thatcher and three SAS personnel after the six-day Iranian Embassy siege in London, May 1980

Margaret Thatcher and three SAS personnel after the six-day Iranian Embassy siege in London, May 1980. She was a big fan of the SAS, who in turn were a big fan of the MP5.

The 22nd Special Air Service Regiment, (better known as the SAS) has been Britain’s premier commando force since the end of world war two. The detachment was made up of then-Major Ian Crooke and a picked sergeant. Crooke had years of experience in Borneo, Ulster, the recapture of the Iranian Embassy in London and other hot spots by the time of the Gambian affair and had risen to third in command of the SAS. He and a sergeant that remains unnamed to this day donned civilian clothes and left for Senegal, Gambia’s neighbor.

They brought grenades, a pair of Heckler and Koch MP5SD submachine guns and a matching set of Browning Hi Power pistols, all of which fired the same 9mm cartridge in a diplomatic pouch. They arrived the next day and walked over the border and into the lawless Gambian capital dressed in polo shirts and blue jeans. They were met by Mr. Clive Lee, a former commando who had retired in Gambia who had been in touch to see if he could be of assistance. The three men ventured together through the capital to assess the situation.

They found that the airport had been retaken already by elite French-trained paratroopers from Senegal, who President Jawara had also contacted for assistance. The three commandos made contact with the Senegalese forces and outlined a plan to retake the city and defeat the rebels. The SAS team went first – disguised as doctors -to the local hospital where President Jawara’s family was being held and disarmed the rebels there without incident. The commandos then led the assault on the radio station and the government’s police armory with support of the Senegalese the next day.

A film crew from the BBC captured the out of place and out of uniform British commandos several times running all over town from engagement to engagement.  By August 3rd, the attempted coup was over and the quiet and professional SAS men flew back to Britain just as President Jawara returned to the Gambia from there.

In the aftermath of this stunning event Major Crooke was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. He retired as a Colonel and now lives in South Africa. It was estimated that anywhere from 600-1000 Gambian casualties were suffered in the three days of rebellion and anarchy. In December 1981 seven ringleaders were sentenced to death after trail for their role in the coup.  President Jawara was re-elected five times in democratic elections and remained the leader of his country until he was removed in 1994…..by a military coup.

4 legal ‘thing that goes up’ stabilisers for pistol AR builds

Super-short AR-15 guns that legally fall under the ATF’s definition of a pistol have been around for decades. However, in recent years these guns have been given a phenomenal jump in popularity due to the Bureau’s approval of a number of non-buttstock braces that can be fitted to these handguns to give the user the ability to fire the gun from a more supported position. We take a look at some of the better designs on the market.

According to the National Firearms Act of 1934 (the NFA), arms that the government thought to be too dangerous for over the counter sales, such as machine guns, suppressors, and short barreled rifles and shotguns, were regulated with an obscene $200 tax and special requirements to obtain one of these registered devices. When you take into account that $200 in 1934 is some $3500 in today’s dollars, you can see why this was thought so unachievable.

In regulating short-barreled rifles, the NFA states that any rifle less than 26-inches overall had to be registered and so regulated. However, as long as a pistol did not have a buttstock, and was made from the beginning as a handgun, it could be shorter than this requirement. That’s where these braces come in at..

2686358_09_grim_reaper_ar15_pistol_sb15_s_640

Read the rest in my column at University of Guns.com

How to tell Pistols, PDWs, AOWs, and SBR

“The National Firearms Act (NFA) was enacted in 1934 in an attempt to control weapons popular in Prohibition era gang warfare. After eighty years its implementation by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) has become rather strange, and its controls on items like short barrels and suppressors seem archaic.

The following infographic shows a variant of the XCR with a 10″ barrel. This is a piston-operated autoloading firearm that can chamber a variety of light rifle cartridges. Under federal law the top three configurations are considered pistols, and no special controls apply to their construction, sale, or possession. (State laws can vary widely on these matters, so those are not addressed here.)

Something weird happens in the fourth configuration: Adding a second vertical grip turns it into an NFA-regulated firearm called an “Any Other Weapon” (AOW), and would be a felony if the receiver were not already registered as an AOW.

To comply with the NFA I had to use a different receiver registered as a Short-Barreled Rifle (SBR) for the last picture.”

NFA_Pistol_AOW_SBR-640

Hattip, EmptorMaven

The Noveske Shorty Uppers: The Blaster

Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster.

Ever seen the Star Wars series where everyone who isn’t rocking a glowing sword or handgun of some sort is sporting a compact laser spitting blaster weapon? Well the closest thing to that long long ago and far far away technology that we have today is a super short upper and Oregon’s Noveske Rifle Works is the place to get them.

What is a super short upper?

Well kids, you see the National Firearms Act of 1934 prohibited many of the really fun things that are out there. This included suppressors, machineguns, pen guns, can guns, and oh yeah, short barreled rifles and shotguns (SBR/SBS). This meant that if you had a rifle with a barrel shorter than 16-inches, you had to register it with Uncle Sam and pay a one-time $200 tax so that the Man knew who had it and where it was.

Since then, new privately owned machineguns were banned after 1986 but SBRs, SBSs, and suppressors are still legal, although they still have the antiquated $200 tax on them. Of course back in 1934 that sum of money was about $3500 in today’s scratch, so let’s just be thankful the ATF hasn’t adjusted that cost for inflation (and please don’t get the bright idea to point that out to anybody!). These so-called NFA or “Class III” items (after the level of FFL dealer that can trade in them) have grown massively in popularity over the past decade.
This can be said especially about super-short barreled AR uppers, of which the Grants Pass, Oregon firm of Noveske is one of the industry leaders….

Noveske Rifleworks Diplomat

Read the rest in my column at University of Guns

Recent Entries »