Tag Archives: USS Indianapolis

The Sad Irony Surrounding a Submarine

Here we see the former Imperial Japanese Navy’s Type B3 “cruiser submarine” I-58 at the American-occupied Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Japan, 28 January 1946, some 75 years ago today.

U.S. Marine Corps Photograph. NHHC USMC 139990

A large boat by WWII standards, some 357-feet overall, I-58 was completed 7 September 1944. Besides her six torpedo tubes and 19 Type 95 torpedos, she could also accommodate as many as four Kaiten human-torpedoes on her deck.

Under the command of LCDR Mochitsura Hashimoto throughout her career, she took part in the unsuccessful attack on Guam in January 1945 as well as Operation Ten-Go off Okinawa, which was also unsuccessful. As a hat trick in failed missions, two of her Kaiten tried to make a run on the 6,214-ton cargo ship Wild Hunter, escorted by the Sumner-class destroyer USS Lowry (DD-770) north of Palau on 28 July, without luck.

Then, to Hashimoto’s great surprise, late on the night of 29 July he came upon the unescorted heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35). The mighty ship, identified at the time by I-58’s nav officer as an Idaho-class battleship– whose profile it did resemble– was not zigzagging and only steaming at 12 knots. What Hashimoto of course did not know was that it had just dropped off the key components of both the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs to the B-29 base carved out of windswept Tinian Island.

Firing all six tubes at the Indy, a lucky ship that had hosted FDR on peacetime cruises, at least two hit, and the cruiser sank just after midnight on 30 July. While I-58 would make a number of further attacks on other American vessels before the end of the conflict, Indianapolis was her only success.

Surrendered and disarmed after VJ Day, on April Fool’s Day 1946, I-58, long stripped of all usable equipment and material, was towed from Sasebo to an area off the Gotō Islands by the submarine tender USS Nereus and scuttled in 660 feet of water.

As for Hashimoto, he had already controversially testified at the December 1945 trial of Charles B. McVay III, the commanding officer of Indianapolis, saying that zigzagging would have made no difference in his attack on the cruiser– a key charge in the case against McVay.

The son of a Shinto priest, the former submarine commander and Imperial Japanese Naval Academy graduate would himself become a priest as well. Ironically, most of his family had been killed in the A-bomb drop over Hiroshima.

In a 1990 trip to Pearl Harbor to attend a December 7th commemoration, he told a survivor of the Indianapolis that, “I came here to pray with you for your shipmates whose deaths I caused,” and spent the rest of his life involved in the effort to clear McVay’s name.

Hashimoto died in 2000, aged 91, only a week before McVay’s posthumous exoneration.

A Special Warship Wednesday

Pausing our regular coverage to acknowledge the 75th anniversary of the tragic loss of the heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis, a vessel we have covered in past Warship Wednesdays.

From Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs:

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Today, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Mike Gilday sent a message to the fleet asking for a moment of silence on July 29, between 11:03 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. EDT, to honor the 75th anniversary of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis (CA 35).

Below is the text of his message:

“On July 30, 1945, just three minutes after midnight, the heavy cruiser USS INDIANAPOLIS (CA 35) was struck by two Japanese torpedoes in the dark of night while conducting a solo transit of the Philippine Sea.  Despite their best efforts, the ship went down in 12 short minutes.  While around 900 of the 1,195-member crew escaped the ship that night, tragically only 316 were rescued.

While much is written about the crews four harrowing days in the waters of the Pacific waiting to be found with few lifeboats, over-exposure to the elements, and almost no food or water, one thing is certain: those brave Sailors and Marines endured impossible hardships by banding together.  And we must do the same today.

So, I ask you to pause and take a moment on July 29, between 11:03 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. EDT, to remember the brave Sailors and Marines of INDIANAPOLIS. Remember their courage and devotion to each other in the face of the most severe adversity.  Remember their valor in combat and the role they played in ending the most devastating war in history.  Honor their memory and draw strength from their legacy.

America. Has. A. Great. Navy.  Our nation counts on you and so do I.  Never more proud to be your CNO.”

The current USS Indianapolis (LCS-17) held their own ceremony in Mayport last week.

Finally, Congress has presented the Indy’s crew with a Congressional Gold Medal for their service. (Nevermind Nancy)

 

Warship Wednesday, May 1, 2019: Indy Radio (on May Day)

Here at LSOZI, we are going to take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1833-1946 time period and will profile a different ship each week. These ships have a life, a tale all their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places.- Christopher Eger

Warship Wednesday, May 1, 2019: Indy Radio (on May Day)

USS Indy Radio Exhibit (4)

(All photos: Chris Eger)

Here we see an immense– and operational— vacuum tube of a General Electric Model TAJ-19 radio complete with its original 1942 U.S. Navy Bu Ships data plates. The location? The entry level of the Indiana War Memorial, home to the USS Indy Radio Exhibit which is dedicated not only to the famous heavy cruiser of the same name but also to all WWII U.S. Navy radiomen and radio techs.

USS Indy Radio Exhibit (2) USS Indy Radio Exhibit (2)

The radio room exhibit, which I stumbled on last Sunday while in town for the NRA Annual Meetings while on the job with Guns.com, was manned by four big-hearted gentlemen who lovingly cared for the very well maintained cabinets. Their ham call sign is WW2IND for you guys looking for QSL cards.

USS Indy Radio Exhibit (2)

USS Indy Radio Exhibit (2)

The TAJ-19 is a 500-watt CW and 250-watt MCW transmitter that operated from 175kc up to 600kc and was used on just about everything the Navy had in WWII that was bigger than a destroyer escort. This one is still operational…

USS Indy Radio Exhibit (2)

Over 32 volunteers worked since 2008 to establish the radio room, sourcing some 174 items from across the country to include surplus equipment from the period battleships USS Iowa and USS Alabama.

Bravo Zulu, gentlemen!

As for the War Memorial itself, they have an amazing collection which I will get to more in future posts including extensive space dedicated to the USS Vincennes, to both modern USS Indiana‘s (Battleships No. 1 and 58), as well as the above-mentioned cruiser, and the more modern attack sub that shares her same name.

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Indy (should) get a Gold Medal from Congress, 74 years after the fact

This photo was taken 27 July 1945, the day before she sailed from Guam to her doom, as documented by the ship’s photographer of USS Pandemus (ARL 18), on the back of the photo. This is probably the last photo taken of her. Caption on back of photo: “USS Indianapolis (CA 35) taken: 1530 27, July 1945, Apra Harbor, Guam, from USS Pandemus RL 18 as it passed heading for the sea. The picture was taken by Gus Buono”. U.S. Navy photo from the Collection of David Buell.

The loss of the Portland-class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35) in 1945 is often cited as the worst disaster in U.S. Naval history. Now, Congress had approved a special medal for the ship.

S. 2101: USS Indianapolis Congressional Gold Medal Act, had 70 co-sponsors in the Senate this session Passed by Congress last week, it goes to the President next.

The medal once struck next year, will be presented to the Indiana War Memorial Museum in Indianapolis, Indiana. Hopefully, surviving Indy vets and their survivors can also claim one of their own.

The findings of the bill:

(1) The Portland-class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis received 10 battle stars between February 1942 and April 1945 while participating in major battles of World War II from the Aleutian Islands to Okinawa.

(2) The USS Indianapolis, commanded by Captain Charles Butler McVay III, carried 1,195 personnel when it set sail for the island of Tinian on July 16, 1945, to deliver components of the atomic bomb “Little Boy”. The USS Indianapolis set a speed record during the portion of the trip from California to Pearl Harbor and successfully delivered the cargo on July 26, 1945. The USS Indianapolis then traveled to Guam and received further orders to join Task Group 95.7 in the Leyte Gulf in the Philippines for training. During the length of the trip, the USS Indianapolis went unescorted.

(3) On July 30, 1945, minutes after midnight, the USS Indianapolis was hit by 2 torpedoes fired by the I–58, a Japanese submarine. The resulting explosions severed the bow of the ship, sinking the ship in about 12 minutes. Of 1,195 personnel, about 900 made it into the water. While a few life rafts were deployed, most men were stranded in the water with only a kapok life jacket.

(4) At 10:25 a.m. on August 2, 1945, 4 days after the sinking of the USS Indianapolis, Lieutenant Wilbur Gwinn was piloting a PV–1 Ventura bomber and accidentally noticed men in the water who were later determined to be survivors of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis. Lieutenant Gwinn alerted a PBY aircraft, under the command of Lieutenant Adrian Marks, about the disaster. Lieutenant Marks made a dangerous open-sea landing to begin rescuing the men before any surface vessels arrived. The USS Cecil J. Doyle was the first surface ship to arrive on the scene and took considerable risk in using a searchlight as a beacon, which gave hope to survivors in the water and encouraged them to make it through another night. The rescue mission continued well into August 3, 1945, and was well-coordinated and responsive once launched. The individuals who participated in the rescue mission conducted a thorough search, saved lives, and undertook the difficult job of identifying the remains of, and providing a proper burial for, those individuals who had died.

(5) Only 316 men survived the ordeal and the survivors had to deal with severe burns, exposure to the elements, extreme dehydration, and shark attacks.

(6) During World War II, the USS Indianapolis frequently served as the flagship for the commander of the Fifth Fleet, Admiral Raymond Spruance, survived a bomb released during a kamikaze attack (which badly damaged the ship and killed 9 members of the crew), earned a total of 10 battle stars, and accomplished a top secret mission that was critical to ending the war. The sacrifice, perseverance, and bravery of the crew of the USS Indianapolis should never be forgotten.

Indianapolis by Michel Guyot

Regardless of the medal. A lasting legacy of Indianapolis is at Great Lakes, and every budding bluejacket learns about her story first hand.

181218-N-BM202-1104 GREAT LAKES, Ill. (Dec. 18, 2018) Recruits receive training at the USS Indianapolis Combat Pool at Recruit Training Command. More than 30,000 recruits graduate annually from the Navy’s only boot camp. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Camilo Fernan/Released)

The incredible photos from the Indianapolis keep coming

This shot of one of her 250-ton triple Mk 14 8″/55 gun turrets I found particularly haunting. It has been sitting at the bottom of the cold black sea with 5,500m of water on top of it for 72 years.

More on the background of the discovery and how USS LST 779’s recently rediscovered log entry came into play:

Indy: Found

The long lost USS Indianapolis (CA-35) has been located at extreme depth by Microsoft wonk Paul Allen operating from the 250-foot R/V Petrel with state-of-the-art subsea equipment capable of diving to 6,000 meters.

Note her bell

Lost 30 July 1945, she was found 5,500 meters below the surface, resting on the floor of the North Pacific Ocean.

This photo was taken 27 July 1945, the day before she sailed from Guam to her doom, as documented by the ship’s photographer of USS Pandemus (ARL 18), on the back of the photo. This is probably the last photo taken of her. Caption on back of photo: “USS Indianapolis (CA 35) taken: 1530 27, July 1945, Apra Harbor, Guam, from USS Pandemus RL 18 as it passed heading for sea. Picture taken by Gus Buono”. U.S. Navy photo from the Collection of David Buell.

“To be able to honor the brave men of the USS Indianapolis and their families through the discovery of a ship that played such a significant role in ending World War II is truly humbling,” said Allen. “As Americans, we all owe a debt of gratitude to the crew for their courage, persistence and sacrifice in the face of horrendous circumstances. While our search for the rest of the wreckage will continue, I hope everyone connected to this historic ship will feel some measure of closure at this discovery so long in coming.”

More here

Warship Wednesday, July 29, 2015: The saddest story of World War II– 70 years ago today

Here at LSOZI, we are going to take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1859-1946 time period and will profile a different ship each week. These ships have a life, a tale all of their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places. – Christopher Eger

Warship Wednesday, July 29, 2015, The saddest story of World War II

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Here we see the Portland-class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35) as she appeared before the war in New York. Tomorrow marks the 70th anniversary of her tragic passing, often cited as the worst disaster in U.S. Naval history. As she was torpedoed on the other side of the International Date Line, at the site of her wreck it is already that time.

We have covered this tragic vessel several times including the Svedi photo collection and a set of papers that we submitted to Navsource and the NHC on her 1936 Friendship cruise, so we’ll keep it short.

The two-ship class of “10,000-ton” heavy cruisers was sandwiched between the half-dozen 9,000-ton Northamptons built in the late 1920s and the seven more advanced New Orleans-class cruisers built in the late 1930s. As such, the twin Portlands were advanced for their time, carrying nearly a thousand tons more armor and 9x 8″/55 (20.3 cm) Mark 12 guns. They had weight and space available to accommodate a fleet admiral and staff if needed.

Indianapolis was laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corporation on 31 March 1930 and was the first warship to carry the name, commissioning 15 November 1932.

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Her prewar career was peaceful and she carried FDR on a trip to South America in 1936 and others.

Narrowly escaping Pearl Harbor by being at sea far to the southeast of Hawaii, she soon was earning battle stars the hard way in New Guinea, the Aleutians (where she pummeled the Japanese troopship Akagane Maru, sending her and her soldiers to the bottom of the cold North Pacific), Tarawa, Makin, Kwajalein, the Marianas, Palau, the Philippine Sea and onto the Home Islands.

View from off her starboard bow, at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, following overhaul, 1 May 1943. White outlines mark recent alterations to the ship. Note new forward superstructure, 8

View from off her starboard bow, at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, following overhaul, 1 May 1943. White outlines mark recent alterations to the ship. Note new forward superstructure, 8″/55 triple gun turrets, starboard anchor, anchor gear on the forecastle, and paravane downrigging chains at the extreme bow. USS Minneapolis (CA-36) is in the background, stripped for overhaul. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

For a good bit of that time, she served as the 5th Fleet flagship of Vice Admiral Raymond A. Spruance.

Admirals Spruance, Mitscher, Nimitz, and Lee aboard USS Indianapolis, Feb 1945

Admirals Spruance, Mitscher, Nimitz, and Lee aboard USS Indianapolis, Feb 1945

LVTs moving in during the invasion of Saipan, 15 June 1944. Heavy cruiser firing in the background is USS Indianapolis

LVTs moving in during the invasion of Saipan, 15 June 1944. Heavy cruiser firing in the background is USS Indianapolis

At Okinawa, she spent a week solid smacking around Japanese shore positions with her big 8 inchers while dodging kamikazes. On 31 March 1945, she was unlucky enough to be severely damaged by one of these flying meatballs and, losing 9 men, set course for Mare Island Naval Yard in California for repairs.

Once patched back together, it turned out the War Department had a mission for her.

In San Francisco, she took aboard parts and 141-pounds of enriched uranium (about half of the world’s supply at the time) for the inefficient Little Boy atomic bomb, which would later be dropped on Hiroshima, producing about 15 kilotons of sunlight when she vaporized in August.

Racing the 6,000 miles from San Fran to Tinian island in just ten days (with a short stop in Hawaii), she arrived unescorted and delivered her payload on 26 July, which would go on to a history of its own only 11 days later.

However, Indy would no longer be afloat by the time Hiroshima’s mushroom cloud peaked.

This photo was taken 27 July 1945, the day before she sailed from Guam to her doom, as documented by the ship's photographer of USS Pandemus (ARL 18), on the back of the photo. This is probably the last photo taken of her. Caption on back of photo:

This photo was taken on 27 July 1945, the day before she sailed from Guam to her doom, as documented by the ship’s photographer of USS Pandemus (ARL 18), on the back of the photo. This is probably the last photo taken of her. Caption on back of photo: “USS Indianapolis (CA 35) taken: 1530 27, July 1945, Apra Harbor, Guam, from USS Pandemus RL 18 as it passed heading for the sea. The picture was taken by Gus Buono”. U.S. Navy photo from the Collection of David Buell.

At 12:14 a.m. on July 30, 1945, the USS Indianapolis was torpedoed by I-58, a Japanese B3 type cruiser submarine in the Philippine Sea and sank in 12 minutes after sending off a distress call. The sub’s commander took her to be an Idaho-class battlewagon and unloaded six torpedoes in her direction, of which 2-3 hit.

Indianapolis was not equipped with sonar or hydrophones, or provided with a destroyer escort despite her captain’s request– the only case in which a capital ship was left unescorted so late in the war.

Of 1,196 men on board the stricken cruiser, approximately 300 went down with the ship. The remainder, about 900 men, were left floating in shark-infested waters sans lifeboats and supplies for the most part. By the time the dwindling survivors were spotted (by accident) four days later only 317 men were still alive.

Survivors of the sinking of the Indianapolis are taken to a hospital on Guam after their rescue in August, 1945.

Survivors of the sinking of the Indianapolis are taken to a hospital on Guam after their rescue in August 1945.

After the war her skipper, Captain Charles B. McVay III, was sent to the mast in a travesty of justice– the only U.S. captain of more than 350 to face trial for having his ship sunk by the enemy in the war. At the trial, the skipper of I-58, which had been captured and scuttled by the Navy in 1946, even testified that McVay was not at fault.

Although cleared by history, McVay later committed suicide. The Navy later adjusted his record, posthumously.

Indianapolis‘s sister ship, USS Portland (CA–33), was decommissioned in 1946 and languished on red lead row until she was scrapped in 1962 although she earned 16 battle stars, making her one of the most decorated ships in the U.S. fleet.

There are several monuments to the Indianapolis and her wreck was located in 2001.

Her bell, removed from the ship at Mare Island in 1945 to save weight, is preserved at the Heslar Naval Armory in Indianapolis.

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There is also a good bit of maritime art to commemorate her.

Indianapolis by Michel Guyot

Indianapolis by Michel Guyot

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She is remembered by a vibrant USS Indianapolis organization, many books, a completed made for TV movie (which was horrible), and a new film with Nick Cage that is currently shooting.

Thirty-two men are still alive from the crew of the USS Indianapolis, including Richard Stephens, 89, who eagerly awaits the Cage film.

“I think it’s going to be a good movie,” said Stephens, who was 18 when he and the others received the command to abandon ship.

He visited the set in Mobile, Ala., earlier this month where the film is being shot on location using Mobile Bay and the USS Alabama museum as a backdrop. “I told (Cage) I didn’t like fictional movies, and they should be trying to show more respect, they should be using the facts. He said it’s going to be pretty true to facts.”

Specs:

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3150×1869 Click to very much bigup

Displacement: 9,800 long tons (10,000 t)
Length: 610 ft. (190 m)
Beam: 66 ft. (20 m)
Draft: 17 ft. 4 in (5.28 m)
Propulsion: 8 × White-Foster boilers, single reduction geared turbines, 107,000 shp (80,000 kW)
Speed: 32.7 kn (37.6 mph; 60.6 km/h)
Complement: 629 officers and enlisted (peace), 1,269 officers and men (wartime as flag)
Armament: 9 × 8 in (200 mm)/55 cal guns (3×3)
8 × 5 in (130 mm)/25 cal AA guns
8 × .50 in (12.7 mm) machine guns
Aircraft carried: 2-5 OS2U Kingfisher floatplanes

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Quinn’s M-1 is back home

When I was a kid I sat in the balcony of the old Ritz theater in downtown Pascagoula and tried to contain my abject horror as I watched a movie about a giant shark eating a tiny boat and everyone on it off of Amity, New York.

The reign of terror was ended by a few well-placed 30.06 caliber rounds from a surplus M-1 Garand formerly owned by a scary former bluejacket from the USS Indianapolis.

jaws rifle
Well, that rifle, serial number 1,808,895 was made at Springfield Armory in 1943– just in time for WWII and later Korean era service. The gun, owned by Mike Papac and Cinema Weaponry, is now on loan to the SPAR where it is on display of famous firearms used in film.

The movie in question?

You know the one…

1934 in the Canal Zone, the 50-ship scouting force

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Balboa Harbor, Panama Canal Zone – Aerial photograph taken 23 April 1934, with the U.S. Fleet’s scouting force on hand for spring maneuvers. The image is remarkable as it is showing four cruisers (including the ill-fated brand-new Portland-class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis), two fleet support ships, and a whopping 44 destroyers moored together. The combined force as shown would have required some 8,000 bluejackets and marines to man them.

It should be noted that all of the destroyers are classic WWI-era four-stacked, flush-decked ships constructed between 1917-20. Pushing obsolescence even in 1934, these 1200-tonish boats had a hard time in World War II (often under British flag) but gave a good account of themselves nonetheless.

The cruisers in the picture, two heavies (Indy and Chicago) and two light (Raleigh and Detroit), also had a hard war ahead of them. Chicago was Sunk during the Battle of Rennell Island, 30 January 1943. Indy was torpedoed and sunk on 30 July 1945 by Japanese submarine I-58, resulting in the loss of nearly 900 of her crew, mainly to shark attack. Raleigh took a torpedo at Pearl Harbor and almost sunk only to survive hard service to be scrapped in 1946. Detroit, also a Pearl survivor who was moored next to the doomed Utah, spirited out 9 short tons of gold and 13 short tons of silver from the Philippines in 1942 and helped with the recapture of the Aleutians before heading the breakers at the end of the conflict.

By and large all of the 50 impressive vessels in this image would be stricken, sunk, or scrapped by 1950.

Ships present include (left to right in lower left):
USS Elliot (DD 146);
USS Roper (DD 147);
USS Hale (DD 133);
USS Dorsey (DD 117);
USS Lea (DD 118);
USS Rathburne (DD 113); An old Wickes-class four-piper destroyer commissioned in 1918, likely the oldest tin can in the picture
USS Talbot (DD 114);
USS Waters (DD 115);
USS Dent (DD 116);
USS Aaron Ward (DD 132);
USS Buchanan (DD 131);
USS Crowninshield (DD 134);
USS Preble (DD 345); and
USS William B. Preston (DD 344).

(left to right in center):
USS Yarnall (DD 143);
USS Sands (DD 243);
USS Lawrence (DD 250);
(unidentified destroyer);
USS Detroit (CL 8), Flagship, Destroyers Battle Force; 7000-ton Omaha-class light cruiser
USS Fox (DD 234);
USS Greer (DD 145);
USS Barney (DD 149);
USS Tarbell (DD 142); and

USS Chicago (CA 29), Flagship, Cruisers Scouting Force; a 9200-ton Northampton-class heavy cruiser.

(left to right across the top):
USS Southard (DD 207);
USS Chandler (DD 206);
USS Farenholt (DD 332);
USS Perry (DD 340);
USS Wasmuth (DD 338);
USS Trever (DD 339);
USS Melville (AD 2); 7200-ton Destroyer Tender, commissioned in 1915 she is the oldest ship in the image but would outlive most.
USS Truxtun (DD 229);
USS McCormick (DD 223);
USS MacLeish (DD 220);
USS Simpson (DD 221);
USS Hovey (DD 208);
USS Long (DD 209);
USS Litchfield (DD 336);

USS Tracy (DD 214);
USS Dahlgren (DD 187);
USS Medusa (AR 1); 10,200-ton Repair Ship
USS Raleigh (CL 7), Flagship, Destroyers Scouting Force; another Omaha-class light cruiser
USS Pruitt (DD 347); a Clemson-class four piper destroyer commissioned in 1920, likely the newest tin can in the image

and
USS J. Fred Talbott (DD 156);
USS Dallas (DD 199);

(four unidentified destroyers);
and last but not least at top right, USS Indianapolis (CA 35), Flagship, Cruisers Scouting Force.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Help save the USS Indianapolis photo collection

The United States Naval Institute (been a member for over twenty years, and so should you!), has a Kickstarter project to try to save the rare photos from the USS Indianapolis and WWII: Preserving the collection of Alfred Joseph Sedivi, the ship’s photographer.

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In the closing days of WWII, torpedoes from a Japanese submarine slammed into the side of U.S.S. Indianapolis, dooming the heavy cruiser. The sailors who did not go down with the ship were left adrift on the open ocean for more than 3 days during which they battled the elements, starvation, and shark attacks. Of the 1,196 crew members who had deployed with the ship, fewer than 320 survived the ordeal. The captain of the ship was forced to bear the burden of the blame for the loss of ship and life, which drove him to commit suicide. He would be posthumously exonerated fifty years later following a campaign helped by the efforts of a boy working on a school project about the incident.

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Among those lost when the Indianapolis sank was Alfred Joseph Sedivi, the ship’s photographer. Sedivi documented the lives of the sailors who served, played, prayed and fought on the ship they affectionately called “the Indy Maru.” Sedivi’s cameras also captured the aftermath of the battles on Tinian, Saipan, Guam, Tarawa and Iwo Jima. His photos survived the war because he secretly sent 1650 of them home to his family until the days before his ship’s fatal mission.

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Example of damage on some of the photos in the collection.

Now the USNI is attempting to save them but needs your help

Go give em a few dollars, come on guys.

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