Tag Archives: new Springfield Armory

Not a bad deal for $800…

A pair of 9mm thoroughbreds are the newest horses in Springfield Armory’s stable of Garrison series M1911 single-action pistols.

Designed as an “heirloom-quality” old-school M1911A1-format pistol available in either a classic hot salt blued carbon steel or rust-resistant stainless-steel format, the Garrison series run match-grade 5-inch barrels and the standard layout of Mr. John Browning’s classic. Switching it up from the familiar .45 ACP caliber, the new Garrisons come in a single-stack 9mm, shipping standard with a stainless steel 9-round magazine.

The cost is around $800. 

And they are pretty easy on the eye as well.

More in my column at Guns.com.

Springer doing better when it comes to Micro-9s

Promising a more full-size performance out of its micro 9 series platform, Springfield Armory announced the new Hellcat Pro on Friday.

Using flush-fitting 15-round magazines rather than the standard Hellcat’s 11+1, the Hellcat Pro brings a 3.7-inch hammer-forged barrel to the carry game in what Springfield says is a smaller footprint than any other gun in its class. For those keeping count at home, the Hellcat Pro runs 6.6-inches in overall length and 1-inch wide, which puts it in the same box as the nominally 10+1 capacity Glock 43X. At a height of 4.8-inches, the Hellcat Pro is a tad shorter than the G43X when the Austrian polymer pistol has its standard mag inserted.

More in my column at Guns.com. 

Springer goes… SL8?

The all-new SAINT Edge Accurized Tactical Chassis, or ATC, from Springfield Armory, uses a monolithic lower chassis and is guaranteed to deliver sub-MOA accuracy.

The rifles, offered in a standard black model as well as an Elite Coyote Brown model with a better trigger and stock, are both built on a one-piece monolithic lower that is machined from 6061 T6 aluminum. Working towards precision use, they both use 18-inch 1:7-twist Ballistic Advantage barrels with .223 Wylde chambers in a truly free-floated design that ensures the barrel and gas system are not in contact with the lower. An Accu-Tite tensioning system eliminates play between the upper and lower.

The rifles use a direct impingement mid-length gas system and M16 bolt carrier groups along with a GI-style charging handle and a carbine “H” heavy tungsten buffer. The receiver extension is mil-spec and has a QD receiver endplate. The upper is made of 7075 T6 aluminum and has M4 feed ramps while the handguard has M-LOK accessory slots. The guns ship with 20-round Magpul PMAGs.

Looks like a combination of an HK91/PSG-1 and an old-school AR15/ M16 handguard, or, taking it a step further, an HK SL8 with a bit more Stoner.

More in my column at Guns.com.

Emp Ronins?

Springfield Armory is blending its Ronin series M1911 single-stacks with that of its carry-ready Enhanced Micro Pistol platform. 

The two new Ronin EMP models include an ultra-compact 3-inch with a 9+1 capacity, and a 4-inch version with a 10+1 capacity. When stacked against traditional M1911s, this is equivalent to Commander and Officer-length guns, only about a half-inch shorter in each instance.

And, with a two-toned look of a carbon steel slide with a hot salt blue finish over a lightweight aluminum frame with a satin silver Cerakote finish, paired with walnut grip panels, they are easy on the eyes.

More in my column over at Guns.com.

Emissary, now in Commander and 9mm versions

Following up on the popularity of the Government-sized Emissary .45ACP M1911, Springfield Armory on Thursday announced a Commander-length model as well as one in 9mm.

As with the earlier model, the Emissary line sports a two-tone finish, with a blued carbon-steel slide and a stainless-steel frame with a squared trigger guard. Carrying a “Tri-Top” cut to the slide, the single-action pistols run a bushingless heavy stainless-steel bull barrel with a one-piece full-length guide rod. For those who want texture in their grip, the series has a grenade-pattern texture on the front and back of the grip as well as the slimline G10 VZ panels.

And they are as easy on the eye and they are capable on the range.

More in my column at Guns.com.

The 1911 is a Perma Staple of the Gun Community

With a narrow profile and an excellent reputation for “stopping power” (in certain calibers) coupled with a host of on-board safety features, John Browning’s big M1911 format single-action pistols can be exceptionally accurate, and, if given a few tweaks and made correctly, can last a lifetime so long as the small internals and barrel are swapped out when overworn. Plus, there is probably no other platform other than the Glock that is backed up by so wide a spread of aftermarket parts and skilled smiths who know how to wring every ounce of performance out of them. Little wonder that gun companies seem to always be introducing new takes on the same gun.

Speaking of which, Springfield Armory this week came out with a new version of Mr. Browning’s single-action single-stack.

Using a forged steel barrel, slide, and frame, Springfield’s new Emissary sports a two-tone finish, with a blued carbon steel slide and a stainless-steel frame with a squared trigger guard. Carrying a “Tri-Top” cut to the slide, the single-action pistol runs a bushing-less heavy stainless steel bull barrel with a one-piece full-length guide rod. For those who want texture in their grip, the Emissary is fully wrapped in a grenade pattern texture from its slimline G10 VZ grips to the matching machining on the mainspring housing and front strap.

The Emissary is billed as blending defensive and custom pistols to create a striking .45 ACP railgun that looks great while still being very capable.

More in my column at Guns.com.

Ronin Commander

The Illinois-based Springfield Armory introduced its full-sized GI-length Ronin Operator earlier this year and is now following up with the lighter, more compact variant that offers the same features for less than $900. The pistol uses a forged carbon steel slide, lightweight alloy frame, and a forged Commander-length 4.25-inch match-grade barrel.

I gotta say, it doesn’t look too bad…

More in my column at Guns.com.