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Real world castaways found by the Mad Foxes

News From 7th Fleet:

Two men wave life jackets and look on as a U.S. Navy P-8A maritime surveillance aircraft

That’s pretty good resolution from a P-8…(U.S. Navy photo by Ensign John Knight/Released)

Two men wave life jackets and look on as a U.S. Navy P-8A maritime surveillance aircraft, Madfox 807, discovers them on the uninhabited island of Fanadik. Three days earlier, the three’s 19-foot skiff capsized after setting out to sea from Pulap, FSM. The P-8A, attached to Patrol Squadron (VP) 5, and operating from Misawa, Japan, responded to a call for assistance from the U.S. Coast Guard and located the men as they waved life jackets and stood next to a large “help” sign made of palm leaves.

The men reported their vessel was capsized by a large wave a few hours after their departure on April 4, and spent the night swimming until they arrived at Fanadik Island, approximately four nautical miles from Pulap. A small boat from Pulap recovered the men from the island with no reported injuries.

(U.S. Navy photo by Ensign John Knight/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo by Ensign John Knight/Released)

It’s far from VP-5s first far-off rescue. The Navy’s second oldest VP squadron, the Mad Foxes were stood up in 1937 and made fame in the “Kiska Blitz” during which their aviators nursed PM-1s through thick Alaskan fog to plaster the Japanese in the Aleutians while keeping an eye peeled for lost P-40 and B-17 crews.

Switching to PV-2 Harpoons the PV-2 Neptunes after the war, they helped pluck one of America’s first astronauts, Commander Alan Shepard, Jr, from the drink, then helped quarantine Cuba. Switching to the P-3 Orion they provided night radar coverage of the Gulf of Tonkin in defense of USN aircraft carriers and went back to the Atlantic to finish the Cold War, even babysitting a stricken Soviet Yankee class sub in 1986.

They switched to the P-8A Poseidon in 2013.

VP-5-photo_logo

SCCY drops no questions asked replacement warranty for theft, because of sketch

sccy

Well it looks like budget gun maker SCCY has dropped their long standing and unique for the industry replacement program for stolen guns because, well, they think they are getting gamed on it.

In an open letter posted to their site last week.

“Recently we were contacted by the BATFE in regard to an unusual amount of SCCY pistols becoming traced pistols as the result of being used in criminal activity. The unusual part of the traces is not based on sheer numbers but, rather, in the ‘time to crime”.  That is, the amount of time it took a firearm to move from its’ sale/transfer to a crime scene. Further research indicated that this phenomena may be an unintended consequence of our theft warranty.

Therefore, although we regret it, the above has led SCCY, as a responsible corporate citizen, to the decision that this program must be drawn to a close. We realize that the majority of people who have contacted SCCY in regard to stolen firearms are honest law abiding firearms owners and this is another instance where a few bad apples have spoiled it for honest citizens. However, in the interest of the public’s safety and welfare we have no choice but to abolish this program.”

Doh.

SS United States could be saved

A conservancy group will announce on Feb. 4 details of the plan currently underway to preserve the aging SS United States, darling of the 1950s liner trade, as a museum.

More here.

FILE - This July 1, 2010, file photo shows the SS United States, a luxury ocean liner removed from service in 1969 and moored for nearly two decades in Philadelphia. The SS United States, a historic and record-breaking ocean liner that once hosted royalty and presidents, has escaped the scrap heap and will undergo a rebirth, supporters announced Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

FILE – This July 1, 2010, file photo shows the SS United States, a luxury ocean liner removed from service in 1969 and moored for nearly two decades in Philadelphia. The SS United States, a historic and record-breaking ocean liner that once hosted royalty and presidents, has escaped the scrap heap and will undergo a rebirth, supporters announced Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Happy Turkey Day

No posts today.

Go get stuffed.

happy thanksgiving

Marlin’s Long Tom 120 scatter-gun

For well over a century JM Marlin’s firearms company made a line of pump action shotguns that got little attention when compared to their much more popular rifle line that both began the company and endure today. Among this flock of rare birds included the super groovy Model 120 with its optional forty-inch (40 inch) goose barrel.

That is not a misprint.

marlin long tom
Read the rest in my column at Marlin Forum

Those pesky Mandalorians

Via Weapon Outfitters "Maressa Fox got the distinction of doing the first photo shoot of 2015 with us!  Here with a Geissele SMR Mk8 rail build, and a patrial Mandalorian armor getup fabricated by DIY Super car" http://weaponoutfitters.tumblr.com/post/107183995872/maressa-fox-got-the-distinction-of-doing-the-first

Via Weapon Outfitters “Maressa Fox got the distinction of doing the first photo shoot of 2015 with us! Here with a Geissele SMR Mk8 rail build, and a partial Mandalorian armor getup fabricated by DIY Super car”  Other gear includes Hodge Defense Systems AU Mod 1 with a Geissele SMR rail, MagPod upgraded magazine, Eotech EXPS3-0 in FDE with a G33 magnifier. (Click to big up)

It seemed fitting to drop this Mandalore quote here:

Here’s why you can’t exterminate us, aruetii. We’re not huddled in one place—we span the galaxy. We need no lords or leaders—so you can’t destroy our command. We can live without technology—so we can fight with our bare hands. We have no species or bloodline—so we can rebuild our ranks with others who want to join us. We’re more than just a people or an army, aruetii. We’re a culture. We’re an idea. And you can’t kill ideas—but we can certainly kill you.- Mandalore the Destroyer

Warship Wednesday March 4, 2015: The Endangered D.C. Destroyer

Here at LSOZI, we are going to take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1859-1946 time period and will profile a different ship each week. These ships have a life, a tale all of their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places. – Christopher Eger

Warship Wednesday March 4, 2015: The Endangered D.C. Destroyer

barry break away

Here we see the Forrest Sherman-class destroyer USS Barry (DD-933) in a beautiful shot of a breakaway after refueling as provided by Jim Buttleman via Navsource.

Following World War II, the U.S. Navy had literally hundreds of very advanced Fletcher, Gearing, and Sumner-class destroyers in the fleet. In fact, many of these ships to include most of the Fletchers, were in mothballs or part-time NRF service. However, by the 1950s the Big Blue was looking for some more advanced tin cans to carry forth fleet operations and help screen the new breed of super-carriers. Four giant 490-foot Mitscher-class destroyers were completed during the Korean conflict era but the Navy thought they were too big. A smaller design, just a bit larger than the WWII Gearings but with more modern equipment was then designed– the Forest Sherman class.

Class leader DD-931 was ordered March 1951 from Bath and was the first of some 18 sisters. These 418-foot long, 4,000-ton full load greyhounds used GE steam turbines and Foster-Wheeler boilers to generate over 32.5-knots at max speed. Equipped with the a trio of the new 5″/54 caliber Mark 42 guns, they could shoot further (26,000 yards) and faster (40-rounds per minute per mount) than other destroyers in the fleet armed with the legacy 5″/38 cal guns. A quartet of 3 inch (76 mm) 50-caliber Mark 33 AAA guns were mounted instead of the previous generations Bofors and Oerlikons and the ships carried both 21-inch anti-surface torpedo tubes and Hedgehog ASW weapons.

The third ship of the class was named after “The Father of the American Navy,” Commodore John Barry. Barry, an American by way of County Wexford Ireland, was a bible-thumping catholic who commanded the early Continental and later United States Ships Delaware, Lexington, Raleigh, and Alliance in a series of combats during the War of Independence after receiving a commission signed by John Hancock. In 1797, at age 52, he received Commission #1 in the U.S. Navy at the hand of George Washington. Fittingly, Barry died while on active duty in 1803. DD-933 was named not only after this venerated gentleman of the sea but in honor of a Clemson-class destroyer, DD-248/APD-29 that was sunk by kamikazes 21 June 1945.

The Commodore still stands tall at Philly's Independence Hall.

The Commodore still stands tall at Philly’s Independence Hall.

USS Barry (DD-933) was ordered 15 December 1952 and built alongside several of her classmates at Bath in Maine, commissioning on 7 September 1956.

USS Barry (DD-933) Underway, circa 1960, after she had been refitted with a bow-mounted sonar. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

USS Barry (DD-933) Underway, circa 1960, after she had been refitted with a bow-mounted sonar. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

She soon was deployed far and wide, conducting port calls with the fleet in South America and Europe before a refit in 1959 that saw her Mk. 25 torpedo tubes removed, new Mk.32 ASW tubes installed, and an advanced SQS-23 sonar fitted.

This made her one of the most advanced platforms in the Atlantic Fleet when the Cuban Missile Crisis kicked off.

Can you say pucker-factor?

Can you say pucker-factor?

Barry lived through that terror-inducing operation, making her own footnote in history when she investigated the Soviet-flagged merchantman Metallurg Anosov, coming close enough to photograph deck cargo. She also kept tabs on C-19, a Soviet Foxtrot-class diesel sub.

Following Cuban service, she led DesRon 24 to Vietnam. There in Southeast Asian waters she spent much of 1965-66 on plane duty watching for crashed naval aviators and alternated this with coastal naval gunfire support of Marine, 1st Cav and ARVN units ashore. Barry fired more than 2200 5-inch shells into Viet Cong and NVA positions with the aid of spotters, receiving two battle stars for her service.

USS Barry (DD-933) at sea after completion of her conversion to ASW configuration, location unknown. United States Navy, Official. Note the 5-inch mount replaced by the ASROC box.

USS Barry (DD-933) at sea after completion of her conversion to ASW configuration, location unknown. United States Navy, Official. Note the 5-inch mount replaced by the ASROC box.

In 1967, another refit saw her ditch a 5-inch mount for a new-fangled ASROC launcher as well as new electronics. The MK-112 “Matchbox” launcher held eight 1100-pound RUR-5 Anti-Submarine Rockets each with a Mk.46 torpedo or a W44 Nuclear depth bomb attached. A below-deck magazine, in the same compartment that held 600 5-inch shells for the mount, was replaced by magazine for another 8 rockets.

Barry then changing her homeport to Athens, Greece. There she had a ringside seat for another Red Banner Fleet v. U.S. Navy standoff in 1973 when the Soviets came eyeball to eyeball in the Med with NATO forces during the Yom Kippur War.

Moving back to CONUS with a homeport in Boston, Barry saw a yearlong overhaul that ended March 1981 that included, among other improvements, the ability for her ASROC to fire Harpoon anti-ship missiles.

Although fresh and ready, she and her sisters were rapidly retired in the early 1980s to make room on the Naval List for the new Spruance-class destroyers. On 5 November 1982, Barry was decommissioned just 19 months after refit and towed to Philly’s red lead row where she was stricken January 31, 1983.

By the end of 1983, 16 of her sisters were mothballed with only USS Edson (DD-946) remaining active until 1988.

Barry, in large part due to her recently reconditioned appearance and storage close to the nation’s capital, was given a reprieve from the scrappers and towed to Washington Navy Yard in May 1983. Used as a floating museum ship maintained by the Navy, she has been used for hundreds of change of command, retirement, and re-enlistment ceremonies for maritime personnel in the D.C. area for the past 32 years.

"A port bow view of the decommissioned destroyer BARRY (DD-933) being towed to the Washington Navy Yard by the fleet tug USNS APACHE (T-AF-172).  The BARRY is to be docked permanently at Pier 2 and will be opened to the public as a museum." 1983 U.S. Navy Photo DN-ST-84-02636 by PH3 Dixon.

“A port bow view of the decommissioned destroyer BARRY (DD-933) being towed to the Washington Navy Yard by the fleet tug USNS APACHE (T-AF-172). The BARRY is to be docked permanently at Pier 2 and will be opened to the public as a museum.” 1983 U.S. Navy Photo DN-ST-84-02636 by PH3 Dixon.

Open to the public nine months a year, she sees over 9,000 civilian visitors to the Navy Museum annually.

Barry on display

Barry on display

If you do the math on that, more than a quarter million people have walked her decks as a museum ship since the Reagan-era while her decks and bridge have been the setting for film and TV series. Her ASROC magazine is now a vistor’s center.

Every Halloween for the past several years she turned into “Ghost Ship Barry” for the sake of the kids.

Ghost-Ship-Barry

Now, with the new Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge being built, the ship would be trapped in the Anacostia River after October 2015, and in response, the Navy intends to tow the 59-year old destroyer out of the capitol and dismantle her.

WASHINGTON (Aug. 21, 2014)  The Pride of Baltimore II hosts visitors while at anchor next to Washington Navy Yard's display ship Barry on Washington D.C.'s Anacostia Riverwalk Trail. The ship, a working replica of the first Pride of Baltimore which was a privateer during the War of 1812, is hosting visitors from Aug. 20-25 in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the burning of the Washington Navy Yard and Washington D.C. in 1814. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass communication Specialist 1st Class Tim Comerford/Released)

WASHINGTON (Aug. 21, 2014) The Pride of Baltimore II hosts visitors while at anchor next to Washington Navy Yard’s display ship Barry on Washington D.C.’s Anacostia Riverwalk Trail. The ship, a working replica of the first Pride of Baltimore which was a privateer during the War of 1812, is hosting visitors from Aug. 20-25 in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the burning of the Washington Navy Yard and Washington D.C. in 1814. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass communication Specialist 1st Class Tim Comerford/Released)

Even when Barry takes her final cruise to the scrappers, her name will live on in the fleet in USS Barry (DDG-52), an Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer, commissioned in 1992.

Of DD-933‘s sisters, 9 were sunk is training exercises in the 1990s, 6 have been sold for scrap (including Forrest Sherman herself last December), and two, USS Turner Joy (DD-951), and Edson, are currently saved as museum ships in Bremerton, Washington and at Bay City, Michigan respectively.

Specs

Post ASW conversion via Shipbucket, McConrads, Scifibug

Post ASW conversion via Shipbucket, McConrads, Scifibug

Displacement: 4050 tons
Length:     418 ft 6 in (128 m)
Beam:     45 ft (13.7 m)
Draught:     19 ft 6 in (5.9 m)
Propulsion:     70,000 shp (52.2 MW); Geared turbines, two propellers
Speed:     33 knots (61 km/h)
Range:     4500 nautical miles (8,300 km)
Complement:    337
Armament:     (in 1956)
3 × 5 in (127 mm)/54,
2 × 3 in (76 mm)/50 twin mounts,
2 × ASW hedgehogs (Mk 11),
4 × 21 in (533 mm) Mk 25 torpedo tubes

If you liked this column, please consider joining the International Naval Research Organization (INRO), Publishers of Warship International

They are possibly one of the best sources of naval study, images, and fellowship you can find http://www.warship.org/

The International Naval Research Organization is a non-profit corporation dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships.

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Happy Halloween Guys

485

Happy Halloween

Send your name to space

I have my name added to the list that is going in the first Orion flight in December.

eger nasa boarding pass

About the closest I’ll ever get to orbit!

To add your name on the list (and earn frequent flyer miles towards the Mars list!) click here by 31 OCT.

 

 

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