Tag Archives: MARSOC

Meet the Marines’ Budweiser

USMC introduces Marine Special Operator insignia for RaidersIn addition to the treasured and iconic Eagle, Globe and Anchor, Marine special warfare personnel who complete training will receive the new Marine Special Operator uniform insignia.

The insignia will be issued to critical skills operators or special operations officers who have completed the grueling 196-day MARSOC Individual Training Course and will not be given lightly. According to a statement from the Marines, the device is similar to the way combat crew wings distinguish an aviation crew chief or jump wings and dive bubbles distinguish a Recon Marine.

“The individual MARSOC operator must be trained and educated to think critically and function in an increasingly complex operating environment — to understand and interact in dynamic, dangerous and politically-sensitive battlefields,” said MARSOC commander, Maj. Gen. Carl E. Mundy III. “Our rigorous training pipeline ensures that a newly minted critical skills operator has developed the skills required for full spectrum special operations. This badge serves as a visual certification that they have trained and prepared to accept their new responsibilities.”

There is much symbolism in the new insignia.

The bald eagle, which represents the U.S., has outstretched wings to show the Corps’ global reach. The upward-facing dagger is the Marine Raider stiletto, used by the force in World War II and patterned after the British Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting Knife. The iconic Raiders’ five star “Southern Cross” pattern commemorates Pacific campaigns. “Spiritus Invictus” in Latin on the scroll above the eagle’s head translates to “Unconquerable Spirit.”

The new device will be issued first to the next ITC graduation class and then out to the rest of MARSOC soon after.

MARSOC wins the recruiting commercial prize

Marine Special Operations Command Raiders often travel to exotic places to make friends and influence people. And that sometimes needs some fresh driving skills.

The above video, in which Raiders get some trigger time on (sorta) concealed Glock 19s and not so-concealed Mk 18 rifles while driving like Fast and Furious extras, is the type of thing that has recruiters in strip malls across the nation thanking the ghost of Chesty Puller.

Beretta who?

Marine Raiders conducting vehicle and weapons training glock 19 Marine Raiders conducting vehicle and weapons training glocks mk 18 Marine Raiders conducting vehicle and weapons training GLOCKS mk 18 ar

MARSOC are now Marine Raiders

marsoc marine radiers

On the 6th of August, 2014, with the proclamation of Commandant of the Marine Corps General James Amos, MARSOC was officially re-flagged as the Marine Raiders. According to the Commandant ,who announced at a MARSOC change of command ceremony that all units within the parent command would undergo a name change. For example, the 1st Marine Special Operations Battalion would now be known as the 1st Marine Raider Battalion et al.

The Marine Raiders were elite units established by the United States Marine Corps during World War II to conduct amphibious light infantry warfare, particularly in landing in rubber boats and operating behind the lines.

“Edson’s” Raiders of 1st Marine Raiders Battalion and “Carlson’s” Raiders of 2nd Marine Raiders Battalion are said to be the first United States special operations forces to form and see combat in World War II.

The Marine Raiders and Navy Corpsmen of WWII earned 7 Medals of Honor, 136 Navy Crosses, 21 Distinguished Service Crosses, 330 Silver Stars, 18 Legions of Merit, 6 Navy & Marine Corps medals, 3 Soldier Medals, 223 Bronze Stars, and 37 Letters of Commendation in their brief service.

“Marsoc: Conquering the mission, failing the men”

Just read a great take on issues inside the MARSOC program in the essay, “Marsoc:Conquering the mission, failing the men”

“The current regimental sergeant major of MARSOC, for example, is a 27-year motor transport Marine, whose previous assignment was – you guessed it – battalion sergeant major of 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, MCRD San Diego. I’ll say that again; the regimental sergeant major of MARSOC holds the MOS of Motor Transport Mechanic. This is the guy sitting on the selection board at the end of A&S deciding who’s fit to become an operator. This is the guy attending joint staff briefings, senior SOF leadership symposiums, liaising with key personnel within SOCCENT, JSOC, etc, sitting across the table from Army E-9s with decades of ODA time, NSW master chiefs, etc. Making policy. Influencing critical decisions. Representing MARSOC. It sounds ridiculous as I sit here writing it, yet it’s a very sad and sobering truth. The operator base is 95 percent enlisted men, and this is our senior enlisted representative. Just to construct a frame of reference for the uninformed, and in the interest of beating a horse well beyond death, a command master chief with NSW – anywhere within the command – is a SEAL. A command sergeant major of an Army special forces group – hell, the command sergeant major of USASOC – is a Green Beret. But the glorious USMC, in its infinite wisdom, perpetuates this ridiculous mantra of “A Marine’s a Marine’s a Marine! We’re all the same, you’re not special, hell, we’re all special because we’re Marines!”, effectively sabotaging the very fundamentals of SOF and its institutional imperatives.”

The rest here

MARSOC member with his FN SCAR-H