Tag Archives: new sig

Nice to see more metal

No, I am not talking about Metallica, I am speaking of the trend in modern handguns to “throwback” from polymer frames to something with a bit more rigidity. Walther did this a minute ago by taking their Q5 and later their Q4 plastic guns and marketing them in a beefier steel frame format.

Now, Sig Sauer has taken their P320 model, which has a serialized internal fire control pack that can be swapped out among many different polymer grip modules and introduced it in an upgraded model with an alloy frame akin to the old P220-225-226-228-229 line.

Meet the P320 AXG Scorpion, with their new Alloy XSeries Grip module.

That’s nice…

Notably, Sig had previously used an alloy frame on their presentation M17s issued to the watch sergeants of the Old Guard’s Tomb Sentinels.

45 Years Down the Road

In the late 1960s, Swiss arms maker SIG began working on a modern combat handgun, a double-action 9mm single-stack pistol, in an effort to replace the Swiss Army’s standard handgun, the Pistole 49, perhaps best known as the SIG P210 (SP47/8). The new model was successful and accepted as the Pistole 75 (P75) in 1975.

SIG then teamed up with West German gun maker J.P. Sauer and Sohn to produce the P75 in the FGR for easy overseas export as the Sig-Sauer P220.

These early guns were first imported into the U.S. by Browning, who branded them as the Browning Double -Action, or BDA. Offered in 9mm, .45ACP and .38 Super, it was pitched as a competition gun and soon appeared in the Bianchi Cup match.

Boom. For reference, $319 on BDA in 1977 is $1350 today

The gun was even reviewed in American Handgunner magazine in 1977, a magazine haunted by Col. Jeff Cooper, the man who would advocate for the 10mm Auto.

Now, fast forward to this week and the now-45-year-old P220 is available in a tricked out 10mm-chambered SAO model, which Cooper would likely approve of.

More on the latter in my column at Guns.com.

Meet the Copperhead, Sig’s attempt at an NFA-compliant SMG

An ultra-compact version of the MPX, Sig Sauer’s Copperhead variant is legally a pistol and is new for 2019.

Featuring a 3.5-inch barrel with an integrated muzzle brake, the 4.5-pound Copperhead comes from the factory with a two-position pivoting brace that Sig advertises as contouring and adapting to the movement of the shooter’s arm. Finished in FDE Cerakote E190, the pistol runs 14.5-inches overall with a top-mounted M1913 rail.

As Sig submitted a variant of their MPX series to the Army for the military’s request to field a new Sub Compact Weapon for use with personal security detachments last year, it is likely a safe bet that the Copperhead stemmed from the same train of thought, but as it is semi-auto and uses a brace, is primed for the commercial market.

More in my column at Guns.com.

SIG brings the compact rat-a-tat-tat with the new MCX Rattler

It’s an escape gun that is just 3.5 inches longer than the super compact HK MP5K, and is chambered in hard-hitting .300 Blackout, which Sig bills as still being accurate and dangerous in the platform out to 200m– something that a 9mm just isn’t. Thus, Sig says the new gun, likely aimed at a contract hinted at earlier this year for SOCCOM, gives “M4 ballistics in a subgun-sized package.”

Released in both a pistol and SMG format, each model features a 5.5-inch PDW barrel with free-floating M-LOK handguards and top Picatinny rail. A gas piston design, the SBR uses a folding stock that gives the rifle an overall length of 16-inches when closed while the pistol has a telescoping 3-position brace that gives it an overall length of 19.3-inches at its shortest, which ironically is slightly longer than the rifle.

The rifle tips the scales at 5.7-pounds while the pistol is 5.1.

More in my column at Guns.com.