Tag Archives: Silencer

From Hush Puppy to Starsky & Hutch

In the late 1960s, Smith & Wesson started a project to provide Vietnam-deployed SEAL Teams with a modified S&W Model 39 9mm pistol that included a slide lock and threaded barrel for a suppressor as well as a 14+1 magazine capacity, a big jump from the Model 39’s standard 8+1 load.

The gun, intended for NSW use to silence sentries or their dogs, became dubbed the “Hush Puppy.”

Note the chest holster…Hush Puppy inside

Well, by 1971, Smith thought the basic model, sans suppressor-ready features, would make a good gun for LE and the consumer markets and introduced it as the more polished S&W Model 59, which soon saw some serious success in the hands of Disco-era police, including a regular appearance on cop shows of the era.

More in my column at Guns.com.

The very quiet Odessa File

Kamas, Utah-based Dead Air has come in from the cold to bring a new user-configurable suppressor to the market that is thin enough to accommodate factory handgun sights. I give you, the Odessa 9:

That HK P7M13, though…

The 9mm suppressor uses a 1.1-inch tube to allow utilization of regular sights, rather than force the user to go without or install high-profile aftermarket sights or optics, and can be adjusted baffle-by-baffle from pill bottle size to a full-length can.

More in my column at Guns.com

There are now over 5 million NFA items on the books, including 1.3 million suppressors

The number of National Firearm Act items saw a huge jump in the past year — including a 50 percent increase in suppressor registration and 39 percent bump in short-barreled rifles registered — according to new data released by federal regulators.

The report provides an overview of the National Firearms Registration and Transfer Record, which is the federal list of all items, such as suppressors, SBRs, short-barreled shotguns, destructive devices and any other weapons logged under the NFA as of April, and updates figures released in February 2016.

In the 14-month period between reports, the total number of NFA items of all kinds has climbed to 5,203,489 — an overall increase of more than 800,000 items.

While the numbers of AOW’s, machine guns and SBSs all saw negligible increases, the biggest jumps in the 14-month interlude came in the numbers of registered SBRs and suppressors.

More in my column at Guns.com

ATF’s NFA branch moving on up

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives has split its National Firearms Act branch into a separate division in hopes of providing more oversight and efficiency.

The new NFA Division will consist of an Industry Processing Branch, focusing on processing forms from the private sector, and a Government Support Branch centered on law enforcement.

The IPB will see the regulatory body dedicate an entire branch to handling the processing of consumer-directed documents including Form 1 and Form 4 applications for the making and transfer of NFA items such as suppressors, and short-barreled rifles and shotguns.

But what does this mean? I talked to the experts to find out…

More in my column at Guns.com

Some things never go out of style

Exotic Swiss arms maker Brügger & Thomet is probably best known for their MP9 series firearms, but have you “heard” of their VP9?

The manually-operated VP9 (veterinary pistol, 9mm) is meant for humane euthanasia by large animal vets in the field and has an integrated suppressor that they bill as the “most quiet pistol in this calibre on the market.”

With a five-shot magazine, it only has two moving parts and at 11.25-inches overall length with its largest can, is about the size of an M1911, though is much quieter. Like classic Welrod (a British WWII design it favors that also used internal wipes) quiet. It sucks that rubber wipes are considered by ATF to be “silencer parts” over here, which makes it rough for U.S. suppressor makers to come up with comparable designs as its impractical to repack these old-school cans on a regular basis.

In the above video by 5.11, they visit B&T AG and talk with Reto Flutsch (that name, tho) and go loud quiet with a VP9.

For more on it’s grandpa, check out the video from Ian with Forgotten Weapons, below.

Clean those cans!

When you cut a “stuck” suppressor in half, you shouldn’t be able to read the solid carbon build up layers like the rings on a tree. Yikes.

Carrollton, Texas’ TPM Outfitters took to social media with a cautionary tale of what not to do when it comes to firearm suppressor maintenance.

TPM specializes in Heckler and Koch products and they were recently sent some demo factory HK MP5SDs– you know, the neat little room broom that comes integrally suppressed– that were having some issues. The problem was two-fold: that the suppressors were “stuck” to the gun and couldn’t be removed and that they just weren’t working anymore.

Turns out there was a reason for that.

“They obviously did not try to take off the suppressors and were seized to the barrels, this is why it is so critical that the suppressors come off every 250-500 rounds to clean the barrel and ports of built up carbon,” notes TPM. “The suppressors were solid carbon all the way to the end cap inside.”

Hanging out at SHOT Show

Whelp, back from the annual gathering of the gun tribes in Las Vegas. Saw some interesting things. Did some interesting things. I think the biggest stories, besides the new SIG M17, is was the Hudson H9 and the SilencerCo Maxim 9.

Prefaced by a quiet build up over the past few weeks via social media, the H9 melds a full-sized 9mm semi-auto to a striker-fired pistol with a crisp 1911 trigger that has a .115-inch travel. But the innovative handgun with its cyberpunk panache didn’t just hatch fully formed from an egg last month.

More here.

Then there is the Maxim. The pistol, a 9mm that accepts double-stack Glock 17 magazines, can be arranged in either a short or a long configuration– both of which are suppressed. The difference in length between the two options is about an inch, with the full-size configuration measuring 10.75-inches overall and the abbreviated one taping out at 9.54-inches, which is about an inch longer than a standard 1911. Weight varies between 37-39 ounces.

More in the video below and in this piece in my column over at Guns.com.

Nothing to see here

The term “gun buyback” is kind of a misnomer as it implies that the people purchasing said unwanted firearms “off the streets” owned them in the first place. Nonetheless, they sometimes turn up interesting items for which those involved pay a song. In recent years this has included a revolver stolen from Teddy Roosevelt and a vintage museum-quality StG44, both of which were saved from the torch.

Sadly, a beautiful M1911 owned by Sammy Davis Jr. was not.

Well, speaking of odd catches at buybacks, the Marin County District Attorney’s Office hosted one earlier this month which was covered by the local paper and I picked up at Guns.com. Why would I pick up such a normally pedestrian news story?

Because they garnered a cherry HK MP5 with a side-folding factory marked stock and four-positon ambi Navy fire control pack lower, as well as a host of mags and a couple of suppressors for $200. At the very least it is a SP89 conversion Sterling VA marked H&K with nice laser on the front.

hk-mp5-with-a-side-folding-factory-marked-stock-and-four-positon-ambi-navy-fire-control-pack-lower
As California frowns on suppressor ownership altogether for civilians and you have to get special permission from DOJ besides your regular NFA hoops for full-autos, the MP5 combo likely came in from out of state, was illegal (say it ain’t possible), a prop house gun, or is a Post-86 dealer sample or LE gun. In any of these cases, there are likely some questions.

The vintage GemTech Pill Bottle: How small can a can get?

Gemtech’s own Alexander Crown did a quiet little rundown (see what we did there) on their old school “Pill Bottle” .22 suppressor.

Gemtech beretta 21 little 22 can called the Pill Bottle. It had a key chain attachment to be discreet

Back in the sweet old days of Mitch WerBell’s Sionics, the British Welrod of WWII and the Navy’s Mk 22 Hush Puppy of Vietnam, most suppressors worked by using internal wipes out of leather or some other material (except notably for the De Lisle Carbine which had 13 rigid baffles made of Duralumin). A few years ago many suppressor companies advertised their wares as “wipeless” but it’s gotten to the point to where almost everything is these days, so you don’t even see the term anymore.

The tiny Pill Bottle is such a device, using a ¼” rubber wipe with a lifespan of about 50 rounds or so.

From Crown’s write up at Breach Bang Clear:

For those of you not familiar with wipe technology, it is essentially some sort of pliable material that a bullet can pass through but gasses can’t. In the very early days of silencers, these could have been made of leather, cotton, or usually plastic/rubber. These wipes have a limited life span and have to be replaced periodically as they wear out, and this poses a problem in our modern day since the BATFE considers them silencer parts. Manufacturers cannot simply ship them to your door, although they can be made by the user. Just not in surplus.

So how big was the Pill Bottle? Try 1.25 inches long and weighing just one (1) ounce.

Oof.

Gemtech Pill Bottle 3

Do yourself a favor and read Crown’s write up, it’s a good look behind the curtain. Makes me want to get my Beretta M21 threaded.

A look inside the Sig SRD762Ti 30 Caliber Suppressor

In May I had a chance to take part in the Third Annual American Suppressor Association Media Day at Knob Creek and got to visit with that great tactical honey badger, Sig’s (formerly AACs) Mr. John Hollister himself and take a look at their SRD762Ti can.

hollister

It’s a pretty interesting Grade 5 Titanium direct thread silencer design with 5/8″-24tpi threads (or a QD version) to match the muzzles of a lot of common .30 caliber rifles on the market today. Rated to provide 135 dB suppression for up to 300 Win Mag it will take everything smaller in diameter ( .204 Ruger, .223/5.56x45mm, 5.45x39mm, 7.62x39mm, 7.62×35 (300 Blackout), 6.5 Grendel, 6.5 Creedmoor, 6.8 Spc, et.al) as well though dB mileage varies with ammo as with any suppressed offering.

SRD762Ti1Weighing in at 17.6 ounces (18.4 for the QD model) and a length of 9.25”, it’s beefy, but wait till you look inside:

sig supp detail

Just look at all those baffles, I mean, that’s a lot of damned baffles….

The taper of the back end is actually the back of the blast chamber and there is no outer sleeve (yup, its technically tubeless) allowing for a lot of volume to dissipate the gas.

The NFA-compliant serialized portion of the SRD762Ti is the machined blast chamber, which houses the silencer’s thread interface

The NFA-compliant serialized portion of the SRD762Ti is the machined blast chamber, which houses the silencer’s thread interface. This SRD556 uses the same concept.

I really dug kicking the tires on the can and it makes a heck of a difference, even moderating the high “tone” that you get when shooting high-powered rifles in a suppressor. I hope to get one to review for Guns.com in coming weeks.

Of course it’s $1K MSRP, so there is that…

 

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