Warship Wednesday Jan.7, the Coasties on Point

Here at LSOZI, we are going to take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1859-1946 time period (sometimes reaching past that as with today’s post) and will profile a different ship each week. These ships have a life, a tale all of their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places. – Christopher Eger.

Warship Wednesday Jan.7, the Coasties on Point

VTN_Pt_Hudson_2
Here we see the United States Coast Guard Cutter Point Hudson (WPB-82322) racing into action “somewhere off the coast of South Vietnam” in 1966. Commissioned in 1961, Point Hudson had but four years of stateside service based in Panama City, Florida before she was made part of Division 13/Coast Guard Squadron One where she served for five years before her transfer to the Republic of Vietnam Navy as RVNS Đặng Văn Hoành (HQ-707) on 11 Dec 1969. Her story, as is that of the other legion of her class, is rather interesting.

In the 42+ years between 5 October 1960 and 28 March 2003, the US Coast Guard commissioned and used 79 “Point” class patrol boats (WPB). The U.S. Coast Guard defines a “Cutter” as a vessel over 100 feet in length, having crew accommodations for extended operations, as these 82-foot vessels met all of those requirements sans length they were only given hull numbers until 1964 when the service changed their mind and began to issue names to cutters larger than 65 feet. Therefore, all were named after various geographical “Points” in the country.

Points at rest 1965. Note the 20mm forward. At the time, These two boats, Point Welcome and Point Ellis, went to Vietnam in 1965 as part of Div 12/CGS1, and never .eft, being turned over to the Vietnamese as RVNS Nguyễn Hấn (HQ-717) and VNS Lê Ngọc Thanh (HQ-705) respectively. these were some of the only US ships to carry the WWII-era Oerlikon. Most others carried the Mk16 20mm gun.

Two Points at rest, 1965. Note the 20mm forward. These two boats, Point Welcome and Point Ellis, went to Vietnam in 1965 as part of Div 12/CGS1, and never left, being turned over to the Vietnamese as RVNS Nguyễn Hấn (HQ-717) and VNS Lê Ngọc Thanh (HQ-705) respectively. these were some of the only US ships to carry the WWII-era Oerlikon. Most others carried the Mk16 20mm gun.

These 60-ton craft, capable of floating in just 6-feet of seawater, were armed at first with WWII surplus Oerlikon 20 mm cannons and equipped with a pair of 600hp Cummins diesels that could putter them around at 16-ish knots. That was the 1959 design concept. This was later increased to a pair of 800hp diesels (which increased speed to over 22-knots when clean) and one hull (Point Thatcher) had an experimental pair of Saturn gas turbines with 1100 HP each, manufactured by Solar Aircraft Co that could break over 25.

Steel hulled and with a then-novel aluminum superstructure, these hardy boats replaced the old 83-foot splinter boats that were left over from the War. Designed for search and rescue and law enforcement missions, they logically were soon sent around the world to a combat zone. Capable of putting to sea with just a 4-man crew, they typically had one twice that size to enable boarding parties.

USCG Cutters nesting in Subic Bay before heading to Vietnam being painted gray

USCG Cutters nesting in Subic Bay before heading to Vietnam being painted gray

During Vietnam, 26 of the class were sent overseas to RVN waters where they formed Coast Guard Squadron One in three divisions.

Point Class Cutters of USCG Squadron ONE stand out of Subic Bay in July 1965 for duty in Vietnamese littoral waters as part of Operation Market Time [2080x1662]

Point Class Cutters of USCG Squadron ONE stand out of Subic Bay in July 1965 for duty in Vietnamese littoral waters as part of Operation Market Time [2080×1662]

To up their armament in their combat mission to control the Vietnamese littoral, these boats were given 5 M2 heavy machine guns (.50 cals), painted 20 shade grey, issued more sidearms to include M3 grease guns, the new M16 rifle, and Thompson submachine guns (not normally seen on Coast Guard cutters stateside),

USCG gunner at the ready of his 50-cal aboard an unamed Point of CGS1 in Vietnam,1970 USN photo

USCG gunner at the ready of his 50-cal aboard an unamed Point of CGS1 in Vietnam,1970 USN photo

Gun locker in the galley of the Point White in Vietnam. A lot of tasty vittles there!

Gun locker in the galley of the Point White in Vietnam. A lot of tasty vittles there! I count at least four M1911 pistols, 3 M1 carbines, an unidentified pump-action shotgun, and 2 M1 Thompson submachine guns.

…and were even fitted with a piggyback 81mm mortar.

Chief Warrant Gunner Elmer L. HICKS, USCG and his 81mm/ M2 piggyback combo

Chief Warrant Gunner Elmer L. HICKS, USCG and his 81mm/ M2 piggyback combo emplaced on shore

A closer look at the 81/.50 mount as emplaced on a Vietnam-bound Point. Note the ready ammo boxes installed.

A closer look at the 81/.50 mount as placed on a Vietnam-bound Point. Note the ready ammo boxes installed. Also note the Coastie’s cracker jacks are virtual copies of those used by the USN– except note the shield on the right arm– this denotes a USCG uniform.

Rel. No. 6135: USCGC POINT LOMAS FIRED AT SUSPECTED VIET CONG CAVE HIDEOUT: An 81mm mortar shell fired from the 82-foot U.S. Coast Guard Cutter POINT LOMAS (WPB-82321) shatters rocks over the entrance to a suspected Viet Cong cave hideout along a beach in a Viet Cong controlled area near Danang. Rounds from a .50 caliber machine gun, mounted piggyback on the mortar gun also were fired into the cave. Commanding the POINT LOMAS is Lieutenant Keith D. Ripley, USCG of Baltimore, Md. The 82-footer was stationed at Port Aransas, Texas, before reporting for duty with Coast Guard Squadron One's Division 12, based at Danang, Vietnam, in July 1965. There are eight 82-footers in that

Rel. No. 6135: USCGC POINT LOMAS FIRED AT SUSPECTED VIET CONG CAVE HIDEOUT: An 81mm mortar shell fired from the 82-foot U.S. Coast Guard Cutter POINT LOMAS (WPB-82321) shatters rocks over the entrance to a suspected Viet Cong cave hideout along a beach in a Viet Cong controlled area near Danang. Rounds from a .50 caliber machine gun, mounted piggyback on the mortar gun also were fired into the cave. Commanding the POINT LOMAS is Lieutenant Keith D. Ripley, USCG of Baltimore, Md. The 82-footer was stationed at Port Aransas, Texas, before reporting for duty with Coast Guard Squadron One’s Division 12, based at Danang, Vietnam, in July 1965. As twist of fate, this cutter would serve both the South Vietnam navy from 1970-75 and then that of the Peoples Republic from 1975-88, being the last former U.S. vessel on the naval list of that country.

A smallboat mission with four crew, including. Weapons included smallarms and M16s with only battle helmets and flak vests providing crew protection. Photo courtesy of Gordon M. Gillies.  More on the story behind this here http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2015/11/the-long-blue-line-eddie-hernandez-and-small-boat-operations-in-vietnam/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheCoastGuardCompass+%28The+Coast+Guard+Compass%29

A smallboat mission with four crew, including. Weapons included smallarms and M16s with only battle helmets and flak vests providing crew protection. Photo courtesy of Gordon M. Gillies. More on the story behind this here

According to the USCG Historians Office from which most of these pictures are drawn:

By the end of 1966 the twenty six 82 foot cutters of Squadron One, their eleven man crews and the support staff who kept the cutters and crews running, had reduced the estimated 70% of enemy’s supplies arriving by sea to less than 10 percent (U.S. Navy Proceedings June 1984, C.G. Reservist November 1996). This forced the enemy to transport most of their supplies over the more difficult and rugged Ho Chi Minh Trail. Fewer than 400 men made up USCG Squadron One in 1965 and 1966, yet in less than eighteen months, they had cut off 60 percent of the enemy’s total supplies that were arriving by sea. A remarkable job, when you think about it.

Seven Coast Guardsmen were killed and 59 wounded in South Vietnam. These included those who involved in the tragic friendly fire incident on the Point Welcome.

While on a patrol in the waters near the mouth of the Cua Viet River, about three-quarters of a mile south of the demilitarized zone, the cutter was attacked by U.S. Air Force aircraft and repeatedly strafed. As a result, the cutter’s commanding officer, Lt. j.g. David Brostrom, along with one crewmen, Petty Officer 2nd Class Jerry Phillips, was killed. Also wounded in this friendly fire were Point Welcome’s executive officer, Lt. j.g. Ross Bell; two other crewmen, Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark D. McKenney and Fireman Houston J. Davidson; a Vietnamese liaison officer, Lt. j.g. Do Viet Vien; and a freelance journalist, Timothy J. Page.

Point Welcom's superstructure riddled with USAF cannon rounds. Friendly fire isn't.

Point Welcome’s aluminum superstructure riddled with USAF 20mm cannon rounds. Friendly fire isn’t. Note the Wile E. Coyote mascot painted on the bridge even got a round right in the ass.

In true USCG fashion, the Point Welcome was patched up, and even Wily was given first aid and returned to service. (Image provided courtesy of ET2 Terry W. Hill., from USCG Historian's office http://www.uscg.mil/history/WEBCUTTERS/Point_Welcome.asp)

In true USCG fashion, the Point Welcome was patched up, and even Wily was given first aid and returned to service. (Image provided courtesy of ET2 Terry W. Hill., from USCG Historian’s office)

During their five years in South Vietnam the men of Squadron 1 put in yeoman’s work fighting armed junks and sampans, wearing out their diesels in constant patrol, and getting in intense firefights with shore based troops:

-Patrolled 4,215,116 miles
-Detected 839,299 vessels
-Boarded 236,396 vessels
-Inspected 283,527 vessels
-Detained 10,286 personnel
-Engaged in 4,461 naval gunfire support missions
-Damaged or destroyed 1,811 vessels including several heavily armed NVA SL4-class trawlers
-Killed or wounded 1,232 enemy
-Damaged or destroyed 4,727 structures

Things stayed pretty hot for the Coasties in Vietnam

Things stayed pretty hot for the Coasties in Vietnam

And recreation was a matter of debate.

Beard growing contest by crewman of USCG 82-footer Division 11, An Thoi, by PHC Frank Borzage, 1965

Beard growing contest by crewman of USCG 82-footer Division 11, An Thoi, by PHC Frank Borzage, 1965

Profile view of Point Cypress showing 50-caliber machine guns mounted on the fantail and amidships with 81mm mortar/50-caliber combination mounted on the bow. Photo courtesy of Gordon M. Gillies.

Profile view of Point Cypress showing 50-caliber machine guns mounted on the fantail and amidships with 81mm mortar/50-caliber combination mounted on the bow. Photo courtesy of Gordon M. Gillies.

Crew on board Point White with weapons confiscated from a Vietnamese junk sunk in a battle with this 82 footer

Crew on board Point White with weapons confiscated from a Vietnamese junk sunk in a battle with this 82 footer

When the Coast Guard pulled out of Vietnam in 1971, the veteran Points there were handed over to the RVN Navy. One of which, the former-Point Clear escaped to the Philippines in 1975 as the RVNS Huynh Van Cu and was used for a number of years by the Navy of the Philippines before being hulked at Subic Bay.

Coast Guard Division 12 of CGS1 being decommissioned and her ships turned over to the short-lived use of the South Vietnamese navy

Coast Guard Division 12 of CGS1 being decommissioned and her ships turned over to the short-lived use of the South Vietnamese navy

The Peoples Republic of Vietnam kept the 25 remaining Points in their possession, slowly disposing them until the last of the group, Ngo Van Quyen (ex-USCGC Point Lomas), was cut up in 1988.

Post-Vietnam, the 53 remaining USCG Points were updated and kept in service. Their 20mm gun was replaced by a pair of single M2 mounts forward and then by the 1980s just carried sidearms.

Point class cutter as they appeared in the 1980s. Note the two 50s forward and the new racing stripes

Point class cutter as they appeared in the 1980s. Note the two 50s forward and the new racing stripes

They fought the war on drugs, saved countless lives, patrolled the border areas and Florida Straits for refugees, and even had a few uncomfortable standoffs with Cuban warships from time to time.

Of the 80 Points built for the Navy and Coast Guard, 54 were completed at the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis 1960-70 while the balance of 26 ships was completed by J.M. Martinac Shipbuilding Corp. 1966-67.

By 1990, the newest Point was over twenty years old and, even though re-engined with fresh Caterpillar Diesels, was still showing signs of hard use. I remember touring the old Point Estero in Gulfport, where she spent her entire 27-year career, with my NJROTC unit and sailing around Ship Island on her. She creaked and rolled even in shallow, still water and low seas.

Still, the ship was professional and her crew told of numerous incidents of running down illegal long liners, patrolling nearby naval yards for the possibility of Soviet mini-subs (this was during the late 80s), tense confrontations with drug runners, and sad tales of searching for those lost at sea. When you take this and multiply it by a factor of 50, you can see how beneficial these little craft were.

It was then the USCG started replacing these craft with the 87-foot Marine Protector series and what I like to call the “Great Point Giveaway” started. In May 1991, the thirty-year-old Type A Point Hope was transferred to Costa Rica, starting the floodgate. Over the next thirteen years, another 39 cutters would follow in that process, given as foreign aid to 17 Countries, of which about half are still in some sort of service:

Antigua- 1
Argentina- 2
Azerbaijan 1
Colombia- 4
Costa Rica- 4
Dominican Republic – 3
El Salvador – 1
Georgia – 2 (which narrowly escaped destruction by the Russians in 2008)
Ecuador – 1
Jamaica – 2
Mexico- 2
Panama- 5 (to help rebuild their navy following the 1989 invasion)
St Lucia- 1
Philippines – 2
Trinidad – 4
Venezuela- 4
Turkmenistan – 1

Venezuela CG Point class cutter still in service

Venezuela CG Point class cutter still in service

point in st lucia cg

ex USCGC Point Turner WPB-82365, who served as a SAR and LE boat in Newport, Rhode Island for 32 years, ended up as the Royal Saint Lucia Police Force’s coast guard cutter Alphonse Reynolds (P01) in 1998 and was still in service as such up until 2012. Click to big up to see that natty waterline rust.

Two former Coast Guard Points, Point Countess and Point Baker, on transfer to the Georgian Coast Guard

Two former Coast Guard Points, Point Countess and Point Baker, on transfer to the Georgian Coast Guard. Notably they have had their .50 cal mounts reinstalled– Russian repellant.

azerbijan navy

ex-Point Brower WPB-82372 as S14 in the Azerbaijan maritime service

PG 394 BRP Alberto Navarette of the Philippines Navy, ex USCGC Point Evans WPB 82354

PG 394 BRP Alberto Navarette of the Philippines Navy, ex USCGC Point Evans WPB 82354. You can bet this craft and the her sistership, the Point Doran, will be eyeball-to-eyeball with the PLAN in coming years. Note the twin 50s up front and what looks to be another set over the stern. These ships, with their shallow draft are useful in combating Islamic terrorists along the huge island chain. Holy Coast Guard Squadron One, Batman!

The last of these transferred, 1970-commissioned Point Bower, went to land-locked Azerbaijan for use on the world’s largest lake, the Caspian Sea in 2003 and was also the last Point in commission with the Coast Guard.

Its amazing how craft deemed by the brass to be no longer worth the effort are quickly snapped up by our overseas allies for another decade or two of service. In fact, Mexico still has one of these boats left over from 1961, the Point Verde (WPB-82311) now in her 24th-year of service to that country as the ARM Punto Morro (P 60).

Of the 13 not sent overseas:

3 ships stripped and scuttled as reefs, with perhaps the Point Swift being the best known of these.

Point Swift being deep sixed

Point Swift being deep sixed. Photo by NJSCUBA.net

Point Arena was listed as in storage at Coast Guard Yard in Curtis, MD although one source mentions that she was destroyed date unknown in firefighting training.

Point Roberts was transferred to EPA as R/V Lake Explorer based out of Duluth, Minnesota. Decommissioned in July 2005 and sold to Basic Marine, Inc. Escanaba, Michigan she was replaced by the former NOAA R/V Rude. Roberts’s ultimate fate is unknown.

Point Harris, based in Hawaii since 1980, was sold to a private owner in 1992 and it is unclear where she is at this time.

3 were transferred to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in 2001:

Point Glass in her early 2000s NOAA configuration

Point Glass in her early 2000s NOAA configuration

Two of these ships, the Point Glass and Point Lobos continued in service until 2006 when they were finally decommissioned and surplused. The Point Monroe was used as the law enforcement patrol vessel for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary flying NOAAs flag and carrying armed Florida State Marine Patrol/Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officers until 2012 when she was removed from service and put up for private sale.

Point Monroe as she appeared for private sale. Note the hull lines

Point Monroe as she appeared for private sale. Note the hull lines

Point Glass went on to the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary and now serves as a Sea Scouts ship in Galveston.

Seattle Maritime Academy's Point

Point Divide as the Seattle Maritime Instructor school ship

3 were donated to Academic programs- Point Divide to the Washington Maritime Academy,  Point Charles to Texas A&M Maritime Academy. Point Brown was donated to Kingsborough CC in 1991 who used her for research for ten years. After a 2001 refit, she was purchased as a private vessel and renamed Lady B.

Lady B still on patrol with the USCGA in NYC

Lady B still on patrol with the USCGA in NYC. USCG Photo.

As the Lady B she still flies the Coast Guard jack as her owner and skipper, Auxiliary Coxswain Stu Sunderland serves with his vessel in the Coast Guard auxiliary in New York City. She is a frequent site along the mid-atlantic coast and has been involved in multiple missions for Sector New York. She just turned 43 years young and is still in semi-regular operation.

An 80th boat, the Sea Scout Ship Point Weber, is still used as part of the Point Weber Youth Maritime  program but she was never a Coast Guard Cutter. Built by the Coast Guard Yard in Baltimore MD specifically for the U.S. Navy in 1962, she was used by the Navy on the West Coast as a firing range control vessel and was donated to the organization in the 1980s.

Point Webber in her role as a scout ship. Although the sun is setting on this class of hardy steel-hulled ships, they aren't quite done yet.

SSS Point Webber in her role as a scout ship. Although the sun is setting on this class of hardy steel-hulled ships, they aren’t quite done yet.

Even though long out of federal service, its likely the last Point sailor, fighting seasickness, is yet to be born.

Specs:
Displacement: 67 (A series), 69 (B/C Series)
Length: 82 feet
Beam: 17.25 feet
Draft: 6.0 feet
Main Engines Twin 1710 Cummins 1200 HP (Series A) later Twin 800 hp Cummins for 1600HP. eventually twin Cat 3412 Diesels
Generators 2 GE 2-71 Diesels
Propellers Twin 42 in. variable pitch
Fuel Capacity 1840 gal. @ 95%
Compliment (1960) 8. (Vietnam) 2 officers, 13 men
Fresh Water Storage 1100 gals
Maximum Speed 22.9 knots (top) by 1980s typically closer to 15
Max Sustained Speed 18.0 knots
Cruise Speed 10.7 knots
Maximum Range 3000 @ 9.4 knots
Radar: SPN-11, CR-103 (1960), or SPS-64
Weapons: single 20mm AAA (as designed) 1 .50 cal/81mm mortar piggyback mount forward, 4 x M2 .50 cal stern, extensive small arms locker (Vietnam ships) 2 x M2 .50 cal forward (1970s stateside ships) small arms only after 1980s

If you liked this column, please consider joining the International Naval Research Organization (INRO), Publishers of Warship International.

They are possibly one of the best sources of naval study, images, and fellowship you can find http://www.warship.org/

The International Naval Research Organization is a non-profit corporation dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships.

Nearing their 50th Anniversary, Warship International, the written tome of the INRO has published hundreds of articles, most of which are unique in their sweep and subject.

I’m a member, so should you be!

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About laststandonzombieisland

Let me introduce myself. I am a bit of a conflict junkie. I am fascinated by war and warfare, assassination, personal protection and weaponry ranging from spud guns and flame throwers to thermonuclear bombs and Soviet-trained Ebola monkeys. In short, if it’s violent or a tool to create violence it is kind of my thing. I have written a few thousand articles on the dry encyclopedia side for such websites as GUNS.com, Univesity of Guns, Outdoor Hub, History Times, Big Game Hunter, Glock Forum, Firearms Talk.com, and Combat Forums; as well as for print publications like England Expects, and Strike First Strike Fast. Several magazines such as Sea Classics, Military Historian and Collector, Mississippi Sportsman and Warship International have carried my pieces. Additionally I am on staff as a naval consultant and writer for Eye Spy Intelligence Magazine. Currently I am working on several book projects including an alternative history novel about the US-German War of 1916, and a biography of Southern gadfly and soldier of fortune Bennett Doty. My first novel, about the coming zombie apocalypse was released in 2012 by Necro Publications and can be found at Amazon.com as was the prequel, Chimera-44. I am currently working on book two of that series: "Pirates of the Zombie Coast." In my day job I am a contractor for the US federal government in what could best be described as the ‘Force Protection’ field. In this I am an NRA-certified firearms, and less-than-lethal combat instructor.

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