Tag Archives: StG44

Damascus Detritus via the Trans-Siberian Railway

To commemorate their involvement in the Syrian Civil War, the Russian military has sent a special train on a victory lap of sorts filled with interesting battlefield bring-backs.

The 14-car train is heavy with improvised fighting vehicles fielded by ISIS and various forces opposed to the Russian-backed Syrian strongman Bashar al-Assad as well as a curious loot of small arms.

Apparently, one Jeep Grand Cherokee was missed during Cash 4 Clunkers

Among the guns captured are FN FAL rifles and FN FALO squad automatic weapons, French MAT-49 submachine guns, UZIs, early M16s and even a few German StG 44 “Sturmgewehr” rifles that date back to WWII.

More in my column at Guns.com

City saves history by turning over rare StG 44 to Navy museum system

A police department in Virginia sat on a seized German military rifle for almost a decade before moving to turn it over to a military museum.

The gun was mailed home by a GI from Europe in 1945…

The Chesapeake Police Department seized a Sturmgewehr 44 in 2009 from a felon that could no longer possess the firearm. Seeing that it had historical significance — the StG 44 is considered by many to be the first true “assault rifle” due to its select-fire design and use of an intermediate cartridge — the agency rendered it inoperable and this week moved to have the City Council approve donating the piece to the U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command.

The resolution was approved 8-0 last Tuesday without discussion.

More in my column at Guns.com

 

I bet Hugo Schmeisser is rolling and spinning

There, under the Krinkov, is a German StG44 in exploded view, which would probably be OK on any monument except that of Mikhail Kalashnikov

As I covered over at Guns.com, the Russians spent 35 million rubles (about $580K US) on a sprawling monument to the late firearms engineer Mikhail Kalashnikov that was unveiled in Moscow last week. Besides a nearly 30-foot high statue of Kalashnikov, the base of a monument to St. Mikhail, the Orthodox patron of gunsmiths and warriors, contains a representation of several of the engineer’s designs including an AK42 sub gun, AK47, AKM and AK74 rifles, as well as RPK and PK machine guns.

However, as noted by some sharp-eyed firearms enthusiasts and reported by Russian-based Kalashnikov magazine, just under a Krinkov AKS-74U is what appears to be the parts diagram for a German StG-44 Sturmgewehr.

Which some (notably outside of the Motherland) have contended that the AK was based on for decades.

This has caused understandable heartburn in Russia, and, as Russian firearms wonks pile on to disagree with the lineage of the AK– noting it is as Russian as a Florida pirated movie salesman, the offending diagram has been torched out.

What the heck is that Combloc guy carrying?

While the Warsaw Pact went the way of the Dodo Bird once the Soviet Union broke apart, and over the past 20 years or so most of the former member states have joined NATO, switching religions on combat doctrine, they rocked some pretty interesting gear during the bad old days of the Cold War.

With the help of Partisan 1943, a blog dedicated to the military history of former Eastern Bloc countries, a took a look at some of these systems.

Polish marine with a Radom FB PM-63 RAK submachine gun. Go looking for one of these on the surplus market.

Polish marine with a Radom FB PM-63 RAK submachine gun. Go looking for one of these on the surplus market.

Yugoslav People`s Army soldiers crossing a river M56 Submachine guns. These Yugo-made room brooms were chambered in 7.62×25mm Tokarev and cheaply cloned from the classic German MP40

Yugoslav People`s Army soldiers crossing a river M56 Submachine guns. These Yugo-made room brooms were chambered in 7.62×25mm Tokarev and cheaply cloned from the classic German MP40

Czechoslovak People’s Army troops aim a locally sourced Skoda Tarasnice-21 recoiless rifle. An 82mm design similar to the Swedish Carl G 84, it was only used by the Czechs, East Germany and Albanians.

Czechoslovak People’s Army troops aim a locally sourced Skoda Tarasnice-21 recoiless rifle. An 82mm design similar to the Swedish Carl G 84, it was only used by the Czechs, East Germany and Albanians.

Albanian People`s Army troops man an obsolete M1939 85 mm AAA gun while they carry that country’s unique SKS design with their distinctive extra-long gas tube covers. Albania withdrew from the Warsaw Pact in 1968 and after her already dated armament was frozen in time after that. Dig the Chinese style stripper-clip belts (you can see it really good on the signal guy).

Albanian People`s Army troops man an obsolete M1939 85 mm AAA gun while they carry that country’s unique SKS design with their distinctive extra-long gas tube covers. Albania withdrew from the Warsaw Pact in 1968 and after her already dated armament was frozen in time after that. Dig the Chinese style stripper-clip belts (you can see it really good on the signal guy).

More in my column at Guns.com

The StG44 and Its Appeal to US buyers

Of all of the world’s military rifles, one of the most exotic and hard to find in US collections is the German StG44. Even though it was mass-produced and nearly a half-million were cranked out, most US firearms junkies have only seen one behind the glass of a museum display or on the History Channel.

When Germany entered World War 2 in 1939, their primary rifle was the K98 Mauser. The K98 was a bolt action 8mm beast that was a slightly modified pre-World War 1 design. It was solid and reliable but heavy and had a slow rate of fire. When the Germans started meeting Soviet Frontovki carrying semi-automatic Tokarev SVT-38 and SVT-40s in 1941, and then increasingly found themselves on the business end of British Sten SMGs and US M1 Garands in 1942, they decided to up the ante and go auto. Choosing the 7.92x33mm Kurz (‘short’) intermediate-sized round, they asked both Walther and Haenel to design a handy select-fire carbine around the bullet. The Haenel team, headed by the famous Hugo Schmeisser  (not to be confused with Hugo Stiglitz), came out on top.

Read more in my column at Firearms Talk