Tag Archive | USS Theodore Roosevelt

Hand Salute, CPT Crozier

The (Acting) SECNAV Thomas B. Modly has booted the skipper of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, Captain Brett E. Crozier (USNA 1994), from his post over the leaked letter the carrier’s commander penned in reference to the spreading COVID-19 cases among his embarked 4,000-man crew.

Several sources told USNI News ahead of the announcement that Navy leaders in the Pacific did not recommend Crozier’s removal from command.

Modly’s two minutes of reasoning is in the video below, essentially boiling down to breaking the chain of command on the face of it, with the unpardonable sin of making Big Navy look bad on the sniff test.

Loose lips sink ships, or at least careers, anyway.

Of course, all the public attention has resulted in the crew getting the attention they needed, which was the meat of Crozier’s concerns.

Crozier had a big send-off from his crew.

A Seahawk and later Hornet driver who flew with the Warhawks of VFA-97, the Mighty Shrikes of VFA-94 and the Rough Riders of VFA-125, Crozier completed numerous downrange deployments during OIF and the Global War on Terror. Serving as the XO of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) for two years and then as skipper of 7th Fleet flagship, USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), for another two before moving into the captain’s cabin of The Big Stick, Crozier was on the path for a star after 26 years of honorable service.

Instead:

Checkerboards over Wake

After an epic two-week battle for the remote island outpost of Wake, 449 Marines, 68 U.S. Navy personnel, and 5 U.S. Army soldiers, as well as a force of civilian contractors, surrendered to a 2,500-man force of Japanese infantry backed up by a 19-ship armada on this day in 1941– two days before Christmas.

While transiting the area, Navy aircraft fly conducted a heritage flight off the coast of Wake Island in the western Pacific Ocean, in October from the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt.

Three Navy CVW-17 birds (NA tail flash), the top two F-18E/F’s from VFA’s 94 and 113, while the bottom is an EF-18G Growler from the Cougars of VAQ-139, over Wake. (Navy photo by Lt. Aaron B. Hicks)

A Marine flight consisted of four F-18C’s from VMFA-312, a unit that first saw combat during the Battle of Okinawa in 1945 and was credited with 59.5 Japanese kills during the war, also participated. As the “Checkerboards” C-model Hornets are a bit long in the tooth when compared with more current E-series Super Hornets, they are a good analogy to VMF-211’s F4F-3 Wildcats flown at Wake back in 1941.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Oct. 26, 2017) Four F/A-18C Hornets, assigned to the Checkerboards of Marine Strike Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312, fly in formation over Wake Island and the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) during a U.S. Navy Heritage event for the crew. Theodore Roosevelt is currently underway for a regularly scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anthony J. Rivera/Released)

The fleet at work

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 21, 2017) Sailors observe a refueling-at-sea with the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) from the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Theodore Roosevelt and Sampson are underway conducting a composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX) with the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group in preparation for an upcoming deployment. COMPTUEX tests a carrier strike group’s mission-readiness and ability to perform as an integrated unit through simulated real-world scenarios. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex Perlman/Released)

Also, note the DESRON 23 “Little Beavers” emblem on her smack.

These views always remind me of the cutaway scene from Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, except without the weird sister cuddling.

Fly me to the (super) moon and let me play among the stars

A few of the better ones that I have seen this week. My skyline was socked in by low altitude cloud cover and I got nothing 😦

161114-N-PJ969-038  CORONADO, Calif. (Nov. 14, 2016) The brightest moon in almost 69 years sets behind the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). The ship is moored and homeported in San Diego. It is undergoing a scheduled Planned Maintenance Availability. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Abe McNatt/Released)

161114-N-PJ969-038 CORONADO, Calif. (Nov. 14, 2016) The brightest moon in almost 69 years sets behind the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). The ship is moored and homeported in San Diego. It is undergoing a scheduled Planned Maintenance Availability. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Abe McNatt/Released)

A member of the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing security forces stands on a flight line near a guard tower at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, Nov. 14, 2016. Behind the Airman a rare Supermoon rises in the sky. The moon has not been closer to the Earth since Jan. 26, 1948. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tyler Woodward)

A member of the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing security forces stands on a flight line near a guard tower at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, Nov. 14, 2016. Behind the Airman a rare Supermoon rises in the sky. The moon has not been closer to the Earth since Jan. 26, 1948. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tyler Woodward)

the Super Moon setting near the USS ALABAMA Battleship Memorial Park... by Tim Ard https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10154113539032607&set=pcb.10154113545592607&type=3&theater

Super Moon setting near the USS ALABAMA (BB-60) Battleship Memorial Park, Mobile Bay by Tim Ard

Tipping point

SAN DIEGO (Nov. 23, 2015) Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Noe Mendoza, from Harlingen, Texas, raises the American flag aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Theodore Roosevelt arrived at its new homeport of San Diego after completing an eight-month around-the-world deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anthony N. Hilkowski/Released)

SAN DIEGO (Nov. 23, 2015) Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Noe Mendoza, from Harlingen, Texas, raises the American flag aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Theodore Roosevelt arrived at its new homeport of San Diego after completing an eight-month around-the-world deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anthony N. Hilkowski/Released)

As noted in an editorial in Sea Power, according to Bryan Clark and Jesse Sloman of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, the Navy/Marine Corps team is at a tipping point, with a 272-ship fleet still tasked like its the old school Lehman 600-ship Navy of the Cold War, of possibly not being able to meet commitments.

The fix, instead of either just pulling a Royal Navy post-Suez drawback or moving to 9-month+ deployments, is to keep more ships overseas and use civilian-manned vessels more. You know, how like we moved the fleet from California to Pearl Harbor in 1940.

From the piece:

One alternative is to “increase further the portion for the fleet that is forward deployed,” the report notes. The advantage of forward-deployed ships is that fewer ships are required to maintain a given level of presence. The adaptation of some Military Sealift Command ships as expeditionary ships in relatively permissive environments, with rotational crews, also could reduce the burden on warships. Maintaining forward-deployed ships is more costly, however.

Clark said the forward deployment of a second aircraft carrier in the Western Pacific would enable the Navy to meet the requirement for a carrier strike group year-round using only forward-deployed forces. This would allow the Navy to get by with a total of nine carriers or, with 11 carriers, it would allow the Navy to keep an East Coast-based carrier deployed to the European area of operations, leaving the Persian Gulf to West Coast-based carriers and the Western Pacific to the two forward-deployed carriers.

Here’s some 21st Century warbird nose art for you: A High Value Target EW kill mark

VAQ-137 EA-18G Growler aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt

From the Aviationist
The image in this post shows the nose of a VAQ-137 EA-18G Growler aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt, supporting Operation Inherent Resolve against Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

Interestingly, the aircraft sports a quite unique kill marking, showing a person “hit” by a lightning bolt.

According to our sources, this is the kill mark applied when the Growler is used in an operation during which it jams cell comms or pick up cell comms and that person is targeted.

All the other “standard” lighting bolts are for generic Electronic Attack support: usually, jamming during ops when F/A-18s are dropping ordnance.

But the cell phone one is very specific to targeting a High Value Target or other individual with a cell or cell-jamming over an area. Ordnance is often employed in this context.

F-14s were huge…

Take a close look at the two dozen Grumman F-14 Tomcats arrayed on the 1,092-foot long flight deck of the Roosevelt below.

Atlantic Ocean (March 10, 2006) – F-14D Tomcats are staged in launch position for their departure from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) to their home port of Naval Air Station Oceana. VF-213 and VF-31 are completing their final deployment flying the F-14 Tomcat. For the past 30 years, the F-14 Tomcat has assured U.S. air superiority, playing a key role in ensuring victory and preserving peace around the world. The F-14 Tomcat will be removed from service and officially stricken from the inventory in September of 2006. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Chris Thamann

Atlantic Ocean (March 10, 2006) – F-14D Tomcats are staged in launch position for their departure from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) to their home port of Naval Air Station Oceana. VF-213 and VF-31 are completing their final deployment flying the F-14 Tomcat. For the past 30 years, the F-14 Tomcat has assured U.S. air superiority, playing a key role in ensuring victory and preserving peace around the world. The F-14 Tomcat will be removed from service and officially stricken from the inventory in September of 2006. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Chris Thamann

And on the elevator of the Conny…

030413-N-0295M-004 Arabian Gulf (Apr. 13, 2003) -- Hanger Deck Crew move a F-14D Tomcat assigned to the ÒBounty HuntersÓ of Fighter Squadron Two (VF-2) onto one of four aircraft elevators aboard USS Constellation (CV 64).  Constellation and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.  Operation Iraqi Freedom is the multinational coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction and end the regime of Saddam Hussein.  U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain.  (RELEASED)

030413-N-0295M-004 Arabian Gulf (Apr. 13, 2003) — Hanger Deck Crew move a F-14D Tomcat assigned to the Bounty Hunters of Fighter Squadron Two (VF-2) onto one of four aircraft elevators aboard USS Constellation (CV 64). Constellation and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Operation Iraqi Freedom is the multinational coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction and end the regime of Saddam Hussein. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain. (RELEASED)

Hold Fast

popeye tr

U.S. Navy Seaman Marlena Peter paints a mural of Popeye the Sailor Man in the foc’sle windlass room aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Dec. 5, 2013, while underway in the Atlantic Ocean US Navy photo 131205-N-BD333-047 by MCSN Bounome Chanphouang

popeye 2
Note the traditional nautical ink including Hold Fast (‘Avast) motto across his knuckles and the sweetheart  tat of Olive Oil.

popeye 3

He first appeared in the daily King Features comic strip Thimble Theater on January 17, 1929, hence the ship out date on his forearm. Then of course the barn swallow on his shoulder is a traditional illustration for a mariner that has seen more than 5,000 nautical miles underway (and since its a land bird, always helps find shore). Also note the old school Figure Eight knot on his right hand denoting pre-1904 service in the old Apprentice programs (the same emblem is used as the seaman apprentice rate insignia these days)

More in Peters here

You Have to Admit, the Tomcat was about as Sexy as it gets…

051010-N-5088T-001 Persian Gulf (Oct. 10, 2005) Ð A specially painted F-14D Tomcat, assigned to the ÒBlacklionsÓ of Fighter Squadron Two One Three (VF-213), conducts a mission over the Persian Gulf. VF-213 is assigned to Carrier Air Wing Eight (CVW-8), currently embarked aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). U.S. Navy photo by Lt.j.g. Scott Timmester (RELEASED)

051010-N-5088T-001 Persian Gulf (Oct. 10, 2005) A specially painted F-14D Tomcat, assigned to the Blacklions of Fighter Squadron Two One Three (VF-213), conducts a mission over the Persian Gulf. VF-213 is assigned to Carrier Air Wing Eight (CVW-8), currently embarked aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). U.S. Navy photo by Lt.j.g. Scott Timmester (RELEASED). The Tomcat was retired from US Naval service on 22 September 2006, just 11 months after this picture was taken.

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