Tag Archive | smg

SMGs are white hot again, in an NFA-compliant format if nothing else

LWRC International is best known for its high-end AR platforms. That makes their new offering kinda neat divergence from that. I give you, the SMG-45:

LWRCI SMG45 c

David Golladay, LWRCI’s marketing director, told me that the SMG, as its name would imply, originated as a select-fire submachine gun for a military customer, complete with a folding stock. This month’s NFA-compliant release doesn’t need a tax stamp and is pitched to the discerning gun owner as the first installment of a broader pistol caliber carbine series.

It’s got a lot of things going for it, like a folding brace, UMP-style mags, and a compact (15.3-inches with the brace folded) envelope. Plus, chambered in .45ACP, it is subsonic all day and suppressor ready right out of the box.

More in my column at Guns.com

For those pokey times

Here we see Heckler & Koch GRAY ROOM PHOTO#35, showing off a prototype HK MP5A2SF submachine gun in 9x19mm para complete with a 10-inch barrel with flash hider and bayonet attachment.

If room brooms with stabby things on the end seem odd, remember that they have been done several times in the past.

The Brit’s Lanchester submachine gun used the 1907 Enfield bayonet and “They don’t like it up ’em!”

The STEN, with the stick attached

The Japanese Hyaku Shiki Kikan-tanju o the Type 100 submachine gun (Photo: NHAM)

Came complete with an Arisaka style skewer (Photo: NHAM)

The Swedish K M/45 used the same bayonet as the country’s Mausers

And even the UZI, as issued by the IDF, used a FAL pattern bayonet

The Sterling accepted a bayonet, although it was rarely used. Still, it looked nice on the presentation models.

Hell, maybe they should bring them back.

Happy New Year, guys!

I hope your 2018 is finding its way out in acceptable fashion. Thank you for reading and following.

Here’s to a great 2019!

Oh, and of course, Victory will be Ours!

Soviet New Year Red partisan propaganda card (S Novym godom), 1942, after all, the Communists couldn’t celebrate Christmas, but everyone loves New Years. Good symbolism with the grizzled “old” year leaving followed by the new, fresh-faced young new year arriving. And yes, I’m loving the PPSH-41 and MP40 combo

A trophy Sterling-Patchett, with an interesting back story

The Sterling-Patchett Mk 5 was a silenced version of the Sterling Submachine-gun. The modification was the work of George Patchett, who had originally designed the Sterling itself. The Mk 5 was adopted by the British armed forces as the Gun, Sub-machine, 9mm L34A1.

This is the commercially sold version with a “crinkle” finish, which featured a wooden foregrip to protect the firer’s hand from the integral suppressor unit, which became hot from the propellant gas which vented into it upon firing:

Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30029460

This particular gun was captured from Argentinian forces during the 1982 Falklands Conflict by the British Army in June 1982 along with 20,000~ other sundry surrendered arms. It was issued (along with standard versions of the Sterling SMG) to the Argentine Marines, and was most notably used by their assault commandos – the Buzos Tacticos – during the initial stages of the Argentine invasion.

These Royal Marines of Naval Party 8901, seen outside of Government House during the Argentine invasion, would later return to the Falklands as part of 42 Commando and settle scores, being the first unit to raise the Union Jack at the compound.

Maschinenpistole 38 vs Maschinenpistole 40, in detail

Ian with Forgotten Weapons takes a look in-depth at the classic German 9mm sub guns of World War II, and what sets them apart.

The MP38 was an open-bolt, blowback burp gun with a folding tubular stock designed by Heinrich Vollmer who had something like a half-dozen different submachine guns in his resume beforehand. While it was a good gun, it was replaced after just two years of production by the follow-on and very similar MP40.

“Now the differences between these two guns are not mechanical at all, really,” says Ian, “They are industrial,” going on to elaborate on the manufacturing processes behind each, with the MP38 being extensively milled while the MP40 was stamped and simplified.

Further explanation and hands-on, side-by-side disassembly ensue.

We’re trading up, says St. Louis Metro PD as they cash out Tommy gun cache

 

From the 1920s through the 1960s, many civilian police forces, such as these cops in Tacoma, Wash, had a few Tommy guns on the racks “just in case” phasing them out after Vietnam with 1033 Program M16A1s

The St. Louis Metro Police Department is parting with most of its huge and historic Thompson submachine gun collection in a move to get a good deal on new duty guns.

Twenty-seven of the city’s 30 Tommy guns will be sold to Midwest Distributors for $22,000 apiece. All told, the Kentucky-based firm will pay $618,500 for the transferrable .45 ACP s sub guns and some other surplus weapons. This is on top of $597,000 paid by Minneapolis-based Bill Hicks & Co. for 1,748 used Beretta handguns currently carried by the department.

The money will go to offset the cost of new Berettas at $450 a pop to equip every officer with as well as a quantity of AR-15s to be used as patrol rifles.

More in my column at Guns.com.

The evolution of the mighty, mighty Owen

In the darkest days of WWII, 24-year-old Pvt. Evelyn Ernest Owen, with 2/17 Battalion of the Australian Army, from Wollongong, New South Wales, submitted a homemade gun he made to the Army for testing.

His handy burp gun used a gramophone spring, was chambered in .22 rimfire, and was rejected.

But he kept working on the design, and, in full production by 1943, proved one of the most popular of WWII submachine guns– at least in Commonwealth service in the Pacific.


More in my column at Guns.com.

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