Category Archives: Zombie

Trigger D and the Undead

Say what you want about the lo-mo blood sprays and 1960s-era Canon Dream lenses characteristic of Zack Snyder’s films, but his new “zombie heist” film isn’t that bad as far as walking running dead movies go.

I caught Army of the Dead last weekend at the local Cinemark (although it is available on Netflix), as I just like movies and they are all but empty these days, with your closest neighbor sitting 75 feet away, and I really liked it.

Besides the 8-minute opening sequence (that should have been the film itself) there was lots of good, semi-accurate gunplay with a great variety of top-shelf hardware on display. The on-screen guns include all the sexy stuff with tons of 10-inch barreled MK18ish builds seen alongside a chrome/nickel-plated M92 with a Krinkov-style triangle buttstock, an IWI Tavor, an FN SCAR with attached 40mm FN40GL, M2 BMGs set to full rock-and-roll, and an HK MP7, among others.

The “Soccer Mom” character, seen just in the opening, is striking and should have gotten her own movie.

Further, the actors had to run through a mini “boot camp” ala John Wick/Saving Private Ryan where they spent a full week drilling “on weapons nomenclature, gun handling, stance, weapon manipulation, moving with a weapon, and working as a cohesive unit.” Let’s be honest, this is more training than most of the county’s gun owners seek out.

The promo material shows the film’s actors, equipped with everything from Colt shorties to West German-made Sig P226s and everything in between, all remarkably using good trigger discipline. (Photos: Netflix/Zac Snyder)

In the end, it isn’t a game-changing film, but it was at least entertaining. If you are into guns, or zombies, or both, you could do far worse.

Overlord actually isn’t that bad of a movie, all things considered

ICYMI, in theatres this month is Overlord, a hybrid war/horror movie. Produced by recent “Star Wars” boss J. J. Abrams, the film is really two movies spliced together. The first half is a general WWII tale highlighting a squad of 101st Airborne paratroopers (506th PIR) on a critical mission on the eve of D-Day. The second half pits said sky soldiers against not only dislikable Nazis but dislikable Nazi zombies.

In short, it’s like you are watching an episode of “Band of Brothers” and suddenly “28 Days” has clicked in, only with more gore.

As a fan of both war movies (just watched both “A Bridge Too Far” and BoB again within the past few months) and zombie stuff (um, what is the name of this blog?), I had to catch it and overall it is not too bad. More of a plot than “Dead Snow.” The CGI is on point as Abrams and Industrial Light & Magic were involved in the production. While it doesn’t bead out Romero of Peckinpah, it does a better job than you would expect.

Also, the hardware is pretty decent and correct. For reference:

One of the primary characters, Cpl. Ford, played by Wyatt Russell (yes, Kurt’s son), is a moody demo guy with a three-day beard who carries an M1 Thompson sub gun in .45ACP, an M1911 in the same caliber carried in an M7 shoulder holster, various fighting knives, and assorted Composition B. He notably does magazine exchanges in a few different scenes and carries the standard 20-round sticks for his Tommy gun in a five-cell pouch rather than the more flashy drum mags which typically were not used in combat.

Cpl. Ford, played by Wyatt Russell, shown getting some cover while using great trigger D in this production still. (Photo: Paramount Pictures)

For more on the guns and a little more review, head to my column at Guns.com

Also, for anyone that wants one, I have two (extra) Overlord posters courtesy of Cinemark. Shoot me a mailing address if you want one.

They are 16×20 and look great in the corner of the gun room.

(Garand not included)

I have to admit, apocalypse builds are growing on me…like mold

Just in time for Halloween of course, these two rifles, an AR flattop build constructed with a split wooden stock around the buffer tube and what used to be an Ottoman Turkish Mauser, seem like they are a step away from being shiny and chrome. But before you reach for the blood pressure meds about hacking up the vintage bolt-gun, the creator cautions the Mauser was on its last legs and was no longer collectible, and of course, AR components are almost dirt cheap these days.

Is that a rake?

The AR reminds me of this SIG 542 (an early 7.62x51mm variant that eventually shrunk down into the SIG 550), in use in the Tchad army in the 80s.

The Swiss made these with all plastic furniture, so the wood is very Sahara “after market”

Anyway, more in my column at Guns.com

A more defensible location

A second wind turbine towers nearly 300 feet above the nearby Stirling solar array at Tooele Army Depot, Utah, March 22, 2016. The $6.5 million wind turbine project is scheduled to be complete later this year and begin generating power. The 1.5 megawatt solar array, consisting of 429 Stirling engine solar dishes spread across 15 acres, is scheduled to be fully operational in 2017. (U.S. Army photo by John Prettyman/released)

A second wind turbine towers nearly 300 feet above the nearby Stirling solar array at Tooele Army Depot, Utah, March 22, 2016. The $6.5 million wind turbine project is scheduled to be complete later this year and begin generating power. The 1.5 megawatt solar array, consisting of 429 Stirling engine solar dishes spread across 15 acres, is scheduled to be fully operational in 2017. (U.S. Army photo by John Prettyman/released)

As a guy who has (and continues to) write post-apocalyptic fiction that may or may not include scattered military units trying to get by when the rest of civilization has get gone’d and maybe left some zombies behind, I find it interesting that DoD is increasingly trying to move bases off the grid.

Such as Tooele Army Depot in Utah. The base, storage site for war reserve and training ammunition scattered around its 23,610 acres and 900 odd igloos, is kinda off the beaten path. Like the perfect place to lay low when crap went pear-shaped.

And it just got better.

They just erected a 200-foot high 2 MW wind turbine, capable of powering 550 homes.

Coupled with a second wind turbine already in use and a 1.5 megawatt solar array, consisting of 429 Stirling engine solar dishes spread across 15 acres, which  scheduled to be fully operational in 2017, the base will soon be off grid and producing all of its own energy needs.

Until the turbines or dishes break or wear out, but hey, nothing is perfect.

Keeping your comms one ammo can away

Via cerebral zero, a pretty sweet mobile commo set up.

Ham radio ammo can 4 Ham radio ammo can 3 Ham radio ammo can 2 Ham radio ammo can

Finishing up my HAM Ammo Can (HammoCan??) The radio is a Kenwood TM281 bolted to the interior of a large ammo can. It can be powers by the 12v AGM battery or 12v solar panel. The solar panel can also charge the battery. Perfect for off roading and camping. Now I’ve got comms 24/7. Even on a cloudy day the solar panel will output 14-15v and on a sunny day 20v. Pretty awesome setup.

Intrepid meets Waterworld

fishervillage on intrepid

Click to big up

Pretty neat depiction of USS Intrepid (CV/CVA/CVS-11) as a fisher-village in a post-apocalyptic scenario by zsolti65 on Deviant Art

Known as the “Fighting I,” Intrepid was laid down just a week before Pearl Harbor and was one of two dozen Essex-class fast fleet carriers completed.

USS Intrepid in the Philippine Sea, November 1944

USS Intrepid in the Philippine Sea, November 1944

Decommissioned on the Ides of March, 1974, she picked up ten battlestars from the Marshall Islands to Vietnam and has been moored as a museum in in New York City since 1982, where she serves as an emergency operations center when needed.

She’s also the only aircraft carrier in the world with her own Space Shuttle

Are you on board with a Glock magazined rifle or carbine?

Sure, we all love our Glock handguns, and there are always the extended barrel kits to turn them into a carbine, but somewhere in that murky middle ground between your trusted handgun, and your favorite rifle is the pistol-caliber carbine– and wouldn’t it be great if they offered them in the same magazine options as your Glock. Well about that.

Why would you want one?

The short length and of the carbine when compared to a full sized rifle or home defense shotgun makes it more maneuverable in tight spaces such as hallways. The size also beings it into the realm of keeping stowed away as a “car-gun” in a trunk emergency kit. The lightweight characteristics of the type (as little as 4-pounds) allow one-handed use if the other hand is needed to manipulate cell phones, flashlights, doorknobs et al while moving through a structure.

The combination of a long barrel adds power to even mild-mannered pistol caliber loads, producing harder hitting impacts. The lower cost of handgun rounds vs. rifle rounds enables more training sessions per the dollar. The long action and butt-stock also mute the recoil considerably. Many people equate felt recoil firing a 9mm carbine to the same as a .22LR target rifle.

With that being said, lets look at what’s out there for the Glock fan in the carbine market (since Smyrna isn’t making one just yet!)

The Kalashnacon custom Glock AK pistol

The Kalashnacon custom Glock AK pistol

And their SBR version...

And their SBR version…

Kel Tec SUB 2000

Kel Tec SUB 2000

NFA in Nevada is making 9mm Glock magged AR lowers

NFA in Nevada is making 9mm Glock magged AR lowers

And of course, there are Just Right Carbines...

And of course, there are Just Right Carbines…

Read the rest in my column at Glock Forum

Yes, Virginia, there are black helicopters (Gasp!)

A UH-60-A Blackhawk helicopter used by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Office of Air and Marine Operations takes off on a demonstration flight from the Bellingham International Airport Friday, Aug. 20, 2004 in Bellingham, Wash. Helicopters similar to this one will be based at the Department of Homeland Security Air and Marine facility based in Bellingham which began operations Friday along the U.S. - Canadian border. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

A UH-60-A Blackhawk helicopter used by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Office of Air and Marine Operations takes off on a demonstration flight from the Bellingham International Airport Friday, Aug. 20, 2004 in Bellingham, Wash. Helicopters similar to this one will be based at the Department of Homeland Security Air and Marine facility based in Bellingham which began operations Friday along the U.S. – Canadian border. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

In case you missed it, on a podcast this week President Obama disclosed that, yes, “black helicopters” the scion of conspiracy theorists since the late 1990s, do, in fact, exist (to a degree).

Well William M. Arkin over at Gawker’s Phasezer column went into pretty decent details:

We’ve know for decades that the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (SOAR) which supports JSOC and these types of operations, flies black helicopters. And since 9/11, that Regiment has doubled in size, with the addition of a 3rd and 4th Battalion.

1st and 2nd battalions, Ft. Campbell, Kentucky.
3rd Battalion, 160th SOAR, Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia
4th Battalion, 160th SOAR, Ft. Lewis, Washington

JSOC also has a unit called the Aviation Tactical and Evaluation Group at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, which flies the most secret helicopters in support of clandestine missions.

And then there’s the FBI Hostage Rescue Team (HRT) at Quantico, Virginia, which has its own helicopter unit doing most of its work inside the United States. That’s the Department of Justice, but it is about as military as military could be.

And what about the apparatus of something called JEEP, the Joint Emergency Evacuation Plan for whisking away presidential successors and VIPs? The helicopters for these missions belong to the Army (at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia), the Marine Corps (at Anacostia Naval Station), and the Air Force (at Andrews AFB, Maryland). And additional helicopters from naval bases in southern Maryland augment that force when middle-of-the-night missions are required.

And that’s not to mention other agencies and departments suspected of having their own black helicopters, including the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Office of Air and Marine Operations, U.S. Marshals Services, the U.S. Park Police…

You get the idea but for the rest, click on over

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